narcissistic personality disorder

(redirected from Pathological narcissism)
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narcissistic personality disorder

 
a personality disorder marked by a grandiose sense of self-importance. Patients are preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love. In spite of these fantasies, they are troubled by a sense of inadequacy and respond to criticism, defeat, or rejection either by indifference or by feelings of rage, shame, humiliation, or emptiness. Their relationships with others are disturbed by expectations of special favors, exploitativeness, overidealization and devaluation of others, and a lack of empathy.

nar·cis·sis·tic per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

1. a pervasive pattern in adulthood of self-centeredness, self-importance, lack of empathy for others, sense of entitlement, and viewing others largely as objects to meet one's needs, manifested in a variety of contexts.
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met. Compare: autosynnoia.

narcissistic personality disorder

narcissistic personality disorder

Autophilia, narcism, narcissism, self-centeredness, self-love Psychiatry A condition characterized by '…a pervasive pattern of grandiosity (in fantasy or behavior), need for admiration, and lack of empathy that begins in early adulthood…'; ±1% of the general population, and 2-16% of the clinical population has NPD. See Autoeroticism, Autosexual.
Narcissistic Personality Disorder > 5 of following criteria
1. Requires excessive admiration
.
2. Grandiose sense of self-importance; believes self to be superior
.
3. Preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance
.
4. Believes that he/she is special and should have only the best
.
5. Has sense of entitlement, ie deserves special favors or treatment
.
6. Exploits interpersonal relations, ie takes advantage of others
.
7. Lacks empathy and concern for others
.
8. Is envious of others or believes them to be envious of him/her
.
9. Displays arrogance
Modified from *Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed, Am Psychiatric Asso, 1994
.

nar·cis·sis·tic per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

(nahr-si-sistik pĕr-sŏ-nali-tē dis-ōrdĕr)
Pervasive pattern in adulthood of self-centeredness, self-importance, lack of empathy, sense of entitlement, and viewing others largely as objects to meet one's needs, manifested in a variety of contexts.
Compare: autosynnoia
References in periodicals archive ?
Kauten and Barry carried out a research on the individuals with pathological narcissism and their peers, and reported that individuals who exhibit narcissistic traits describe themselves as people who exhibit pro-social behaviours, while their peers reported the opposite as the case (8).
In Understanding and Treating Pathological Narcissism (Ed.
270) What Augustine describes as monstrous vanity, with an attendant lack of emotion and affection, is now described in more clinical terms as pathological narcissism.
(22) Kernberg is of the opinion that self-hatred rather than self-love lies at the root of pathological narcissism. (17) Narcissism is linked to feelings of inferiority and the inability to accept oneself.
His letter, surprisingly, has been taken at face value by the media and is almost being relegated to a footnote to this shameful scandal but a careful reading of it reveals the pathological narcissism of the man whose contrition is an artful construct.
The end result, in a nutshell, is pathological narcissism: the individual gets stuck between what psychoanalyst Phillip Bromberg, reflecting on his clinical work with narcissistic patients, appositely calls 'the mirror and the mask':
Goebbels, who suffered from polio, is revealed to have been a depraved, sexually obsessed individual, and an Olympic-class seducer whose "pathological narcissism" led him to record his conquests.
Os principais textos utilizados foram: Borderline Personality Organization (Kernberg, 1967), Borderline Conditions and Pathological Narcissism (Kernberg, 1975), Technical considerations in the treatment of borderline personality organization (Kernberg, 1976), La Transferencia y la contratransferencia em el tratamento de pacientes fronterizos (Kernberg, 1979), Principios Generales del Tratamento (Kernberg, 1979), Severe personality disorders (Kernberg,1984), Mundo Interior e Realidade Exterior --Teoria aplicada as relacoes objetais (Kernberg, 1989) e Psicoterapia Dinamica de Pacientes Borderlines (Kernberg, Selzer & Koensigsber, 1991).
Pathological narcissism form significant barriers to achieving an individual analytic identity.
Empirical studies have supported clinical observations that pathological narcissism characteristics can be expressed in temporary traits or in stable, enduring personality disorder manifested as: grandiosity (the most distinguishing and discriminating evidence-based criterion), vulnerable and fluctuating self-esteem, strong reactions to perceived challenges or threats to self-esteem, self-enhancing interpersonal behavior, self-serving interpersonal behavior, interpersonal aggression and control, fluctuating or impaired empathic ability, and exceptionally high or perfectionist ideals and standards (Ronningstam 2009).
Self relations, object relations, and pathological narcissism. Psychoanalytic Review, 67,3-23.