pathology

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pathology

 [pah-thol´o-je]
1. the branch of medicine treating of the essential nature of disease, especially of the changes in body tissues and organs that cause or are caused by disease.
2. the structural and functional manifestations of a disease. adj., adj patholog´ic, patholog´ical.
clinical pathology pathology applied to the solution of clinical problems, especially the use of laboratory methods in clinical diagnosis.
comparative pathology that which considers human disease processes in comparison with those of other animals.
experimental pathology the study of artificially induced pathologic processes.
oral pathology that which treats of conditions causing or resulting from morbid anatomic or functional changes in the structures of the mouth.
speech pathology (speech-language pathology) a field of the health sciences dealing with the evaluation of speech, language, and voice disorders and the rehabilitation of patients with such disorders not amenable to medical or surgical treatment. See also speech-language pathologist.
surgical pathology the pathology of disease processes that are surgically accessible for diagnosis or treatment.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pa·thol·o·gy

(pa-thol'ŏ-jē), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word in the sense of 'disease' or 'abnormality.'
The form of medical science and specialty practice concerned with all aspects of disease, but with special reference to the essential nature, causes, and development of abnormal conditions, as well as the structural and functional changes that result from the disease processes.
[patho- + G. logos, study, treatise]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pathology

(pă-thŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. patholo·gies
1. The scientific study of the nature of disease and its causes, processes, development, and consequences. Also called pathobiology.
2. The anatomic or functional manifestations of a disease: the pathology of cancer.

pa·thol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pathology

1. The medical science and specialty dedicated to the study and diagnosis of disease processes, based on analysis of objective parameters–eg, gross examination of tissues, microscopy, chemical and immune-mediated assays, cultures of microorganisms, etc. See Anatomic pathology, Anatomic/clinical pathology, Chemical pathology, Clinical pathology, Comparative pathology, Digital pathology, Immunopathology, Neuropathology, Speech pathology, Stereopathology, Surgical pathology, Telepathology.
2. A term used in working medical parlance for a pathologic lesion.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pa·thol·o·gy

(pă-thol'ŏ-jē)
The medical science, and specialty practice, concerned with all aspects of disease but with special reference to the essential nature, causes, and development of abnormal conditions, as well as the structural and functional changes that result from the disease processes.
[patho- + G. logos, study, treatise]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pathology

The branch of medical science dealing with bodily disease processes, their causes, and their effects on body structure and function. Subspecialties in pathology include MORBID ANATOMY, HISTOPATHOLOGY, HAEMATOLOGY and CLINICAL CHEMISTRY. Practitioners of forensic pathology apply all these disciplines to criminal investigation.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

pathology

the study of the structural and functional changes caused by disease.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Pathology

The branch of medicine that looks at abnormal changes in cells and tissues which signal disease.
Mentioned in: Joint Biopsy
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pa·thol·o·gy

(pă-thol'ŏ-jē) Avoid the jargonistic use of this word in the sense of disease' or 'abnormality.'
Form of medical science and specialty practice concerned with all aspects of disease, but with special reference to the essential nature, causes, and development of abnormal conditions and structural and functional changes that result from disease.
[patho- + G. logos, study, treatise]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about pathology

Q. what is the most accurate pathological test to identify the primary source of a cystic mass in the neck? the mass was removed. Pathologist was unable to identify the source and diagnosed the mass as a branchilogic carcinmoa (which is extremely rare, if exists at all). Therefore, I am looking for the most updated test and examinations that can be applied to blocks of the mass and determine their origin (primary source)

A. Pathologic examinaions under a microscope are the most accurate ones there are, and sometimes even they don't help to identify the cell types. I do not have any other ideas on other tests you can do, and I believe you should follow the treatment your doctors will advise you based on this diagnosis they have made.

More discussions about pathology
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References in periodicals archive ?
The first 20 data points are normal cases, and the remaining 6 data points are pathological cases.
These combined detectors identified pathological cases earlier and consistently better than equivalent individual detectors.
The approach we proposed in this article detected correctly half of the pathological cases, with acceptable false positive rates (7.5 percent), early enough to permit clinical intervention.
This means that if the rule-based system is calibrated to provide a similar amount of advance warning for the same fraction of pathological cases as our system, it will also recommend twice the number of Cesarean sections for healthy babies.
This is why both automated systems are able to detect the pathological cases much earlier than the birth time (and consequently, earlier than the doctors who happened to deliver those babies).
After confirming that the registration results were satisfactory and accurate when dealing with non-pathological bones, the method was applied to pathological cases to verify its applicability for the assessment of disease evolution.
Bone erosion only locally affected the bone volume of interest, and changes were minimal and limited, which showed that the method can produce satisfactory results in pathological cases as well.
After this preliminary study, a rigorous clinical validation of the method in pathological cases is planned as a future activity.
The statistical system of the Ministry of Health, where all data on pathological cases and the services provided to the pilgrims are entered, will release special reports on the health status of the pilgrims.

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