pathognomy


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

path·og·no·my

(path-og'nŏ-mē),
Rarely used term for diagnosis by means of a study of the typical symptoms of a disease, or of the subjective sensations of the patient.
[patho- + G. gnōmē, a mark, a sign]

pathognomy

(1) A term of waning use that dignifies disease diagnosis based on signs and symptoms.
(2) The formal study of the expression of emotions as manifested by voice and body language.

pathognomy

(păth-ŏg′nō-mē) [Gr. pathos, disease, suffering, + gnome, a means of knowing]
Diagnosing the cause of an illness after careful study of the signs and symptoms of a disease.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
These authors also utilized pathognomy: the turpitude of Radcliffe's villains La Motte in The Romance of the Forest and Montoni in The Mysteries of Udolpho and the terror of their victims are revealed through facial expressions (Tytler 301).
Duchenne did not thus merely discard physiognomy and classical pathognomy (47), the 'metaphysics' to which passions had been relegated.
15-17 for a discussion of pathognomy and physiognomy as means of establishing a taxonomy of passions both in general and in the Gothic culture of the eighteenth century.