pathognomonic

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pathognomonic

 [path″og-no-mon´ik]
specifically distinctive or characteristic of a disease or pathologic condition; denoting a sign or symptom on which a diagnosis can be made.

path·og·no·mon·ic

(path'og-nō-mon'ik),
Characteristic or indicative of a disease; denoting especially one or more typical symptoms, findings, or pattern of abnormalities specific for a given disease and not found in any other condition.
[see pathognomy]

pathognomonic

/pa·thog·no·mon·ic/ (path″ug-no-mon´ik) specifically distinctive or characteristic of a disease or pathologic condition; denoting a sign or symptom on which a diagnosis can be made.

pathognomonic

(pə-thŏg′nə-mŏn′ĭk, păth′əg-nō-)
adj.
Specific to a certain disease or condition, as a symptom or finding on physical examination.

pathognomonic

[pəthog′nəmon′ik]
Etymology: Gk, pathos + gnomon, index
(of a sign or symptom) specific to a disease or condition, such as Koplik's spots on the buccal and lingual mucosa, which are indicative of measles.

pathognomonic

Medtalk adjective Referring to a distinctive sign, Sx, or characteristic of a disorder on which a diagnosis is made

path·og·no·mon·ic

(path'og-nō-mon'ik)
Denoting something characteristic or indicative of a disease; denoting especially one or more typical symptoms, findings, or patterns of abnormalities specific to a given disease and not found in any other condition.

pathognomonic

Of a symptom or physical sign that is so uniquely characteristic of a particular disease as to establish the diagnosis.

pathognomonic

characteristic symptoms of a disease

pathognomonic (paˈ·thg·nō·mänˑ·ik),

adj relating to characteristic symptoms of a disease that are generally used as the basis for making a diagnosis.

path·og·no·mon·ic

(path'og-nō-mon'ik)
Characteristic or indicative of a given disease; denoting especially one or more typical symp toms, findings, or pattern of abnormalities specific for a given disease and not any others.

pathognomonic, (pəthog´nəmon´ik),

adj relating to a sign or symptom unique to a disease or one that distinguishes it from other diseases.

pathognomonic

specifically distinctive or characteristic of a disease or pathological condition; denoting a sign or other indicant on which a diagnosis can be made.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of Shafer's sign is pathognomic for a retinal tear, so if detected the patient should be referred immediately regardless of whether the retinal tear is visualised.
In the present research none of the biopsy findings were specific or pathognomic of leprosy, which seem to corroborate other studies.
Diagnosis of PG is an exclusion process, as no laboratory parameter or histopathology pathognomic features are available.
For example, auditory hallucinations are deemed to be pathognomic of a disease entity called 'schizophrenia'.
There are no pathognomic findings on clinical or radiographic examination which confirm skull base osteomyelitis.
While Schiller distances himself from Lavater's postulated equivalence of body and soul, this episode shows that he allows the possibility of a pathognomic reading of the face.
Treatments should be pathognomic sign in RA initiated prior to erosions-- MRI, ultrasound are more sensitive 3.
However, bowing of the tibiae should not be considered pathognomic of treponemal infection (Hackett 1978; Ortner 2003).
The cardinal and pathognomic feature of diabetes is hyperglycemia.
The previous case reports have shown that the cytological appearance can be rather variable and by no means pathognomic but is usually predominantly characterized by a population of small and large lymphocytes, often in a background of hemorrhage and endothelial cells.
Microscopic examination reveals a highly varied internal structure but includes the pathognomic physaliphorous cells: eosinophilic cells with bubbly cytoplasm indenting the nucleus.
Considering that signs and symptoms of Toscana virus meningitis are not pathognomic, this case highlights the need for rapid and specific diagnostic tools, such as PCR assays, to identify infections caused by Toscana virus and other neurotropic viral agents.