pathogen

(redirected from Pathogens)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

pathogen

 [path´o-jen]
any disease-producing agent or microorganism. adj., adj pathogen´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

path·o·gen

(path'ō-jen),
Any virus, microorganism, or other substance causing disease.
[patho- + G. -gen, to produce]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pathogen

(păth′ə-jən)
n.
An agent that causes disease, especially a virus, bacterium, or fungus.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pathogen

Any disease-producing microorganism.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pathogen

Popularly, bug Any disease-producing microorganism. See Blood-borne pathogen, Emerging pathogen, Food-borne pathogen, Intracellular pathogen, Water-borne pathogen.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

path·o·gen

(path'ŏ-jĕn)
Any virus, microorganism, or other substance that causes disease.
[patho- + G. -gen, to produce]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pathogen

Any agent that causes disease, especially a micro-organism.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

pathogen

or

pathogene

any organism that causes disease, such as a virus, bacterium or fungus.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Pathogen

Any disease-producing agent or microorganism.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

path·o·gen

(path'ŏ-jĕn)
Any virus, microorganism, or other substance causing disease.
[patho- + G. -gen, to produce]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In tests with mice, the vaccine provided immunity against all three pathogens. Till date, no licensed vaccines existed against any of these pathogens.
"This supports influenza prevention in asthmatic children, consideration of pathogen identification on presentation, and exploration of treatment intensification for infected patients at higher risk of treatment failure," the authors write.
Since the early 1950s, diseases caused by soilborne pathogens have been managed primarily through the use of preplant soil fumigation.
(1-2) One of the biggest issues is that a target is needed to know which test(s) can lead to an accurate diagnosis; the laboratorian must know what pathogen is suspected.
Interaction between vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant pathogens. Phytopathol., 72:1115-1119.
According to the company, the NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel requires only minutes of hands-on time, with no upstream reagent preparation.
This would lead to a reduction in the amount of product testing needed if validated pathogen reduction and control measures are implemented by companies.
With CANARY biosensors, the rapid kinetics and signal amplification of cell-based signaling enables pathogen detection at sensitivities down to 50 cfu/pfu within 5 minutes.
ISLAMABAD -- Contamination is common in contact lens storage cases, say Israeli researchers who found at least one pathogen in two-thirds of 30 storage cases used by 16 people.
Certain antibiotics have been so rampantly abused across the world that pathogens have very high levels of resistance towards them.
In general, these bacterial pathogens are considered "highly clonal," meaning that the overall gene content of each species is very similar.