maternal effect

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maternal effect

an environmental phenomenon in which the phenotype of an offspring is influenced by the maternal tissue. An example is the adverse influence of maternal smoking on the weight of the unborn baby.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Note, however, that the transmission of nonnuclear genes through sperm does not guarantee a paternal effect on progeny phenotype unless these genes have strong phenotypic effects.
The nature of this paternal effect was clarified when we compared offspring sired by the Romanian male with their half sibs sired by Swedish males.
However, the absence of significant variation among maternal half-sib families suggests that variation among paternal half-sib families may be due to a nonnuclear paternal effect. In particular, the sire-nested-within-diallel component of variance was significantly larger than the dam-nested-within-diallel component ([F.sub.9,9] = 7.51, P = 0.003).
Chetan and Dada drew attention to the importance of male factors in the success of implantation and in the clinical pregnancy rate [1], especially the paternal effect of sperm DNA damage in the stages of embryonic development, and also criticized the fact that the male factors have not been studied in this study.
The testers/pollinators denoted normal portion of paternal effect over maternal for bolls plant-1 (20.83 %), boll weight (27.91%), and micronaire value (29.67%).
(22) However, in a separate analysis of the same 98 prenatally diagnosed cases in New York State, Hook and Cross found no paternal effect (Jyothy et al 2000).
Nevertheless recent studies have pointed that not only maternal improper physiological response but also paternal effect had an important role in the pathogenesis.2 Epidemiological studies have showed that maternal exposure to paternal sperm cells had protective effect against preeclampsia.
Professor Hasan Arshad, who conducted the research, said: "We have known for decades that allergy runs in the family and many thought that maternal effect was greater than paternal effect due to a mother's closeness to her child, but we have discovered the inheritance is from mother to daughter and father to son," Prof Arshad said.
"We have known for decades that allergy runs in the family and many thought that maternal effect was greater than paternal effect due to a mothers' closeness to her child, but we have discovered the inheritance is from mother to daughter and father to son," Prof Arshad said.
Paternal effect genes are important because without them a fertilised egg cannot develop into an adult.
Such a paternal effect would be expected if there was selection on both parents.