maternal effect

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maternal effect

maternal effect

an environmental phenomenon in which the phenotype of an offspring is influenced by the maternal tissue. An example is the adverse influence of maternal smoking on the weight of the unborn baby.

maternal

pertaining to the female parent.

maternal antibodies
see maternal antibody and passive immunity.
maternal bond
see dam-offspring bond.
maternal effect
the transitory influence of the mother on the phenotype of her offspring, caused by factors such as milk yield and uterine environment.
maternal neglect
failure of the dam to stay with the neonate, failure to groom it, help it to feed, find it if separated. The extreme degree is desertion. Characteristic of some breeds, e.g. merino ewes. See also mismothering.
maternal nutritional status
body condition of a dam, pregnant or with a neonate at foot; important management feature as insurance for the survival of the offspring.
maternal obstetric paralysis
a common abnormality after a difficult calving, especially in a heifer. It is caused by pressure on peripheral nerves, and manifests itself as weakness, paresthesia in one hindleg, or difficulty or inability to rise. The ligaments, joints and muscles are normal. See also obturator paralysis.
maternal pelvic inlet
the size of the aperture leading from the peritoneal to the pelvic cavity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists made the discovery while engaged in a project to work out the molecular blueprint of a paternal effect gene.
One distinct paternal effect is that fathers seem to provide a "wake-up call" with their stimulation that complements the more soothing styles mothers use with babies; the outcome is that as early as 30 days after birth, newborns behave differently with their fathers and mothers.
Fathers have important influences on adolescent children (Cookston & Findlay, 2006; Regnerus & Luchies, 2006), but most research examining paternal effects on development, as well as research on the factors influencing father involvement, concerns the early period of the child's life.
Tollrian didn't look for paternal effects because the water fleas reproduced without sex, as they do in the wild for all but about one brood a year.
Until the mid-1970s, investigations into paternal effects on normal child development were very rare.