paternal age effect

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paternal age effect

The effect that increased paternal age has on the incidence of genetic disease.

Conditions with paternal age effect
Achondroplasia, acrodysplasia, Klinefelter syndrome, Marfan syndrome. Paternal chromosomal defects occur in 2.6% of habitual abortions; most are translocations, occurring at a rate of 10-fold greater than normal. Increased maternal age is classically associated with chromosome defects in progeny, often in trisomies.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(12) observed no correlation between paternal age and "sex ratio" in sperm and aneuploidy frequency.
Univariate analysis showed that increased maternal age ([greater than or equal to]35 years) contributed to CHD risk in DS patients (OR: 5.32, 95% CI: 1.43-19.82; p=0.013), while increased paternal age ([greater than or equal to]40 years) had no effect on CHD in DS patients (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 0.66-9.19; p=0.182) (Table II).
One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare continuous variables(such as paternal age, maternal age, paternal BMI, maternal BMI, duration of infertility, etc.) between groups and pair wise comparisons of the groups were performed with least significant difference (LSD) test.
While the medical profession has not clearly accepted the definition of when does advanced paternal age begins, it ranges from 35 to 45.
We hear a lot about the risk of Down's syndrome with older mothers but little is said about the possible hazards of a higher paternal age. And there are some to consider.
5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Advanced paternal age is associated with adverse infant and maternal outcomes, according to a study published online Oct.
"The risk associated with advanced paternal age should be included in discussions regarding family planning and reproductive counseling."
For the study, researchers from the Stanford University in the US accessed data on all 40,529,905 live births to look at the impact of paternal age on a range of outcomes for the infant and the mother.
They concluded that 'in general, advanced paternal age strongly influences the quantity of seminal fluid volume, liquefaction time, and sperm motility and this may impact on male fertility and management of male infertility considering rising paternal age.'
These clefts have complex and heterogeneous etiology, with several genes involved, associated to environmental influences, such as smoking (3), alcohol, maternal and paternal age, use of drugs and folic acid deficiency (5).
Several associated factors have been described in its development, like biological aspects (chromosomal anomalies, immunological alterations), environmental aspects (exposure to radiation, viral infections, socioeconomic status, and parental occupation), maternal aspects (breastfeeding, the mother's consumption levels of alcohol or tobacco, nutritional supplements [2-4]), and familial features (family history of cancer, advance maternal and/or paternal age, and number of previous siblings); however the etiology for the most of childhood cancer is still unknown.
Sociodemographic factors considered included maternal age ([less than or equal to]19 years; 20-24 years; 25-29 years; 30-34 years; 35+ years), paternal age (18-24 years; 25-49 years), maternal race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic White; non-Hispanic Black; Hispanic; NonHispanic Other), marital status (married; not married), poverty level (0-99 percent; 100-199 percent; 200-399 percent; 400-700 percent), highest maternal educational attainment (less than high school; high school; some college or more), and maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) (normal weight (15-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25.0-29.9 kg/m2) and obese ([greater than or equal to]30.0 kg/m2).