pastoral

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pastoral

emanating from or pertaining to the use of land for pasture.

pastoral rearing
raising of young, after weaning, on pasture where they are more susceptible to nutritional deficiencies and parasitic infestation than young reared indoors.
References in periodicals archive ?
As an archetypal example of locus horribilis, the barren and deadly no man's land of World War I is indeed radically opposed to the pastoral connotations of the flower (eminent consolatory feature of the locus amoenus), just as their traditional literary vehicles, the epic and the pastoral elegy, have seemingly opposite functions.
With regard to English Studies scholars in China who specialize in ecocriticism, more of these scholars are turning to local ecocriticism studies such as Shuyuan Lu's 2012 [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (The Specter of Yuanming Tao), a study of the pastoral in Chinese literature in which Lu addresses China's growing disenchantment with industrialization.
Entrusted with the Gospel: Paul's Theology in the Pastoral Epistles.
This article attempts to analyze a shift in the ancient genre of pastoral in the poetry of the Southern modernists, Allen Tate and John Crowe Ransom, a shift that seeks to account for the historical penetration of nature and that is often aestheticized as the ironical counter-text of the "cold" pastoral.
That Kathleen owns a children's bookstore provides another sign that You've Got Mail plays with traditional pastoral tropes, as the lead characters of many modern pastorals are children.
Both as genre or formal "song" (treated in her first three chapters), and as malleable "story" (in her last four), pastoral "suspends" oppositions and "strips away" the superfluous to reveal what is basic to humanity, to use Lindheim's often repeated verbs for what she says pastorals do.
One important aspect of the complexity of these texts not explored by Wardi is that, in contrast to European and white American pastorals, in which characters often remove themselves from a flawed to an ideal environment, escaping from history and the self-confrontation that might equip them to improve society, characters in black writers' texts often return to the very place that necessitated their own or their ancestors' escape.
Vergil's Eclogues, which established the conventions for all self-conscious later pastorals, followed the Idylls in most particulars except its panoramic rural gaze, opting instead to focus more cleanly on the interplay between shepherds alone, situated as they now were not in a quasi-realistic Sicily but the imaginary realm of Arcadia.
Poggioli does not, for example, assert that these traditional pastorals, such as "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love," include all pastoral mutations, nor, as Peter Lindenbaum claims, does he "oversimplify pastoral's main appeal" (6).
I have never chosen to preach on the Pastorals, feeling that they feed a legalizing, overly controlled, uptight way of faith.
26] Thus Browne's Britannia's Pastorals is filled with lamentations for the fate of Protestantism, nostalgia for Elizabethan animosity toward Spain, and idealization of the rural landscape.
The word was revived during the Renaissance, when some poets employed it to distinguish narrative pastorals from those in dialogue.