Pasteurella


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Related to Pasteurella: Pasteurella pestis

Pasteurella

 [pas″tĕ-rel´ah]
a genus of gram-negative, nonmotile, facultatively anaerobic, ovoid to rod-shaped bacteria. P. multoci´da is the etiologic agent of hemorrhagic septicemia. P. haemoly´tica and P. pneumotro´pica are animal pathogens that sometimes cause infection in humans.

Pasteurella

(pas'tū-rel'ă),
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile bacteria containing small, gram-negative, cocci or ellipsoid to elongated rods that, with special methods, may show bipolar staining. These organisms are parasites of humans and other animals, including birds. The type species is Pasteurella multocida.
[L. Pasteur]

pas·teu·rel·la

, pl.

pas·teu·rel·lae

(pas'tū-rel'ă, pas-tūr-el'ē),
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus Pasteurella.

Pasteurella

/Pas·teur·el·la/ (pas″ter-el´ah) a genus of gram-negative bacteria (family Pasteurellaceae), including P. multo´cida, the etiologic agent of the hemorrhagic septicemias.

Pasteurella

[pas′tərel′ə]
Etymology: Louis Pasteur
a genus of gram-negative bacilli or coccobacilli, including species pathogenic to humans and domestic animals. Pasteurella infections may be transmitted to humans by animal bites or scratches. The plague bacillus, Pasteurella pestis, is now called Yersinia pestis; P. tularensis, which causes tularemia, has been reclassified as Francisella tularensis.

Pas·teu·rel·la

(pastyūr-elă)
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile bacteria (family Brucellaceae) containing small, gram-negative cocci or ellipsoidal to elongated rods that, with special methods, may show bipolar staining. These organisms are parasites of humans and other animals, including birds. The type species is P. multocida.
[L. Pasteur]

pas·teu·rel·la

, pl. pasteurellae (pas'tūr-el'ă, -lē)
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus Pasteurella.

Pasteur,

Louis, French chemist and bacteriologist, 1822-1895.
Pasteurella
Pasteurella aerogenes - species found in swine that can cause human wound infections following a pig bit.
Pasteurella multocida - bacterial species associated with dogs and cats.
Pasteurella pestis - Synonym(s): Yersinia pseudotuberculosis
Pasteurella "SP" - a rarely encountered organism that can cause infection after a guinea pig bite
Pasteurella tularensis - Synonym(s): Francisella tularensis
Pasteur effect - the inhibition of fermentation by oxygen, first observed by Pasteur.
Pasteur pipette - a cotton-plugged, glass tube drawn out to a fine tip, used for the sterile transfer of small volumes of fluid.
Pasteur vaccine
pasteurellosis - infection with bacteria of Pasteurella.
pasteurization - bacteria destruction process.
pasteurizer - pasteurization apparatus.

Pas·teu·rel·la

(pastyŭr-elă)
Genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile bacteria containing small, gram-negative, cocci or ellipsoid-to-elongated rods; parasitic in humans and other animals, including birds. The type species is P. multocida.
[L. Pasteur]

Pasteurella

a genus of gram-negative facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria.

Pasteurella aerogenes
found in pigs. A cause of wound infections from pig bites.
Pasteurella anatipestifer
see Riemerellaanatipestifer.
Pasteurella anatis
see Gallibacterium anatis.
Pasteurella avium
see Avibacterium avium.
Pasteurella caballi
causes respiratory infections in horses.
Pasteurella canis
commensal in dogs. Can cause bite wound infections and also pneumonia in cattle and sheep.
Pasteurella dagmatis
commensal of dogs and cats. Cause of bite wound infections.
Pasteurella gallinarum
see Avibacterium gallinarum.
Pasteurella granulomatis
see Mannheimiagranulomatis.
Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A
now called Mannheimiahaemolytica and M. glucosida.
Pasteurella haemolytica biotype T
see P. trehalosi (below).
Pasteurella langaaensis
a commensal of birds
Pasteurella lymphangitidis
a cause of lymphangitis in cattle.
Pasteurella mairii
a cause of abortion in sows.
Pasteurella multocida (syn. Pasteurella septica) types A, B, D, E, F
the cause of hemorrhagic septicemia in cattle, sheep and pigs, fowl cholera of birds, pasteurellosis of rabbits, and gangrenous mastitis of ewes. It is also commonly found in atrophic rhinitis of pigs. Divided into three subspecies, gallicida, multocida and septica, but these do not appear to have any host species predilection.
Pasteurella pestis
see yersiniapestis.
Pasteurella piscicida
causes pasteurellosis in a range of marine warm water species especially in the Mediterranean and Japan.
Pasteurella pneumotropica, Pasteurella stomatis
recovered from dogs, cats and rodents and may be involved in infected bite wounds. P. pneumotropica also causes pneumonia and abscesses in rodents.
Pasteurella salpingitidis
see actinobacillussalpingitidis.
Pasteurella skyensis
cause of mortalities in farmed Atlantic salmon.
Pasteurella species A
cause of sinusitis and conjunctivitis in birds.
Pasteurella species B
cause of wound infections. Possibly a commensal of dogs and cats.
Pasteurella stomatis
commensal in dogs and cats, but can cause bronchitis in dogs and wound infections.
Pasteurella testudinis
associated with respiratory disease in tortoises.
Pasteurella trehalosa
(P. haemolytica biotype T) cause of septicemic disease in weaned sheep.
Pasteurella trehalosi
cause of septicemic pasteurellosis in older lambs, goats and pigs. Previously called P. haemolytica biotype T.
Pasteurella tularensis
see francisellatularensis.
Pasteurella volantium
recovered from chickens. See Avibacterium volantium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pasteurella multocida sepsis and meningitis in 2-month-old twin infants after household exposure to a slaughtered sheep.
Studies on Pasteurella pestis in fleas, comparative plague-vector efficiency of Xenopsylla vexabilis hawaiiensis and Xenopsylla cheopis.
One hundred and thirteen sinuses were cultured; none contained Pasteurella multocida (Fowl Cholera) or other aerobic pathogens.
Key Words: cirrhosis, Pasteurella multocida, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis
The new vaccine, a true child of high tech, was created by deleting a large piece of a gene called aroA from each of three culprit bacteria: Pasteurella haemolytica, P multocida, and Haemophilus somnus.
According to Chinese-American veterinarian Lexie Endo, turtles sold in live animal markets carry salmonella and pasteurella bacteria, both potentially fatal to humans.
From behind the lines in North Korea came word that many of the Chinese invaders had become incapacitated and were dying of a rapidly spreading sickness resembling the type of plague common in China (Yersinia pasteurella pestis).
His laboratory is also studying several enzymes and toxins produced by the bacterium Pasteurella hemolytica, which are important in causing disease in cattle.
Many of the big cats, like their domesticated relatives, harbor Pasteurella multocida.
Contamination of natural waters and mud with Pasteurella tularensis and tularemia in beavers and muskrats in the northwestern United States.
Shipping fever in cattle and sheep, and enzootic pneumonia of sheep and goats are considered caused by Pasteurella multocida, alone or associated to other pathogens.