passerine

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Related to Passerine bird: Passeriformes, Perching birds

passerine

(păs′ə-rīn′)
adj.
Of or relating to birds of the order Passeriformes, which have feet specialized for grasping branches and similar structures, with the first toe facing backward. The order includes the songbirds and certain other groups, such as the flycatchers of the Americas.
n.
A bird of the order Passeriformes. Also called perching bird.

passerine

any member of the avian order Passeriformes (singing or perching birds), which includes some half of the known species of birds.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were 15 species of passerine birds (Table 2) in 9 families, and initially 12 or 13 species were observed in treatments.
Reproductive biology of shrub steppe passerine birds: geographical and temporal variation in clutch size, brood size, and fledging success.
Path coefficients for the relations between extrapair paternity rate, sperm length, sperm storage tubule (SST) length, and SST number for 21 species of passerine birds [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED].
The maximum diversity of passerine bird species was found in Jinnah Garden and Woodland Wildlife Park which was 14 bird species out of 23 observed passerine bird species but the minimum diversity was found in Shalimar Garden which was 7 bird species (Figure-3)
(1996), who have suggested that for guiding principles for bird conservation in the Neotropics, one might focus on assemblages of endemics and habitat specialists rather than on sheer number of species, we do suggest using Indicator Species analysis as a clue for detecting groups of Passerine bird species that would be bioindicators.
This may help to explain why most passerine birds delay molting until the end of the breeding season, a pattern that usually has been explained by energetic considerations (Walsberg 1983).
As the first report of DM in a passerine bird, this case begins to describe potential management strategies for this avian order.
This genome size may be typical of most passerine birds (Shields and Helm-Bychowski, 1988).
(5,11) Native passerine birds were also trapped for exportation, and birds were shot for fun by boys, as additions to collections by amateur naturalists, and also to be eaten, as in the case of the bobolink.
These species include all the corvids tested, as well as House Sparrow and Common Grackle, two abundant passerine bird species likely to be important reservoir hosts in some locations, and Ring-billed Gull.
The 25 species of passerine birds reported in this study differ somewhat from the previously reported 24 species by Roberts (1992).
For an up-to-date definition of tanager, we turned to the online Unabridged Merriam-Webster which defines it thus: "any of numerous American passerine birds (family Thraupidae) having brightly colored males, being mainly unmusical, and chiefly inhabiting woodlands."