Parvoviridae


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Par·vo·vir·i·dae

(par'vō-vir'i-dē),
A family of small viruses containing single-stranded DNA. Virions are 18-26 nm in diameter, are not enveloped, and are ether resistant. Capsids are of cubic symmetry, with 32 capsomeres. Replication and assembly occur in the nucleus of infected cells. Three genera in the subfamily Parvovirinae are recognized: Parvovirus, Erythrovirus, and Dependovirus, which includes the adeno-associated virus. A second subfamily, Densovirinae, has three additional genera, all of which infect arthropods.

Parvoviridae

/Par·vo·vi·ri·dae/ (pahr″vo-vir´ĭ-de) the parvoviruses: a family of DNA viruses with a linear single-stranded DNA genome, including the genera Parvovirus and Dependovirus.

Par·vo·vir·i·dae

(pahr'vō-vir'i-dē)
A family of small viruses containing single-stranded DNA. Three genera are recognized: Parvovirus, Densovirus, and Dependovirus, which includes the adeno-associated satellite virus.

Par·vo·vir·i·dae

(pahr'vō-vir'i-dē)
A family of small viruses containing single-stranded DNA. Three genera are recognized: Parvovirus, Densovirus, and Dependovirus, which includes the adenoassociated satellite virus.

Parvoviridae

a family of small (20 nm diameter) icosahedral single-stranded DNA viruses that are nonenveloped. There are three genera of veterinary importance: Parvovirus, which includes feline panleukopenia virus, mink enteritis virus, canine, bovine and porcine parvoviruses and Aleutian mink disease virus; Densovirus, which occur in insects; Erythrovirus which infect primates; and Dependovirus, which are defective, requiring adenoviruses to complete their replication, and are nonpathogenic (called also adeno-associated viruses). Autonomously replicating parvoviruses replicate only during S phase of the cell cycle, i.e. they attack dividing cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Genome sequences and phylogenetic analyses revealed that BuV comprised at least 3 genotypes and was distinct from all other known members of the Parvoviridae family (1,2).
Human parvovirus B19 is a single stranded DNA virus in the genus erythrovirus of the family Parvoviridae.
Parvovirus-B19 (PV-B19) is a member of Parvoviridae, which is one of the smallest DNA viruses.
Human parvovirus B19 (PVB19) Parvoviridae familyasina ait kucuk, cift sarmalli ve zarfsiz bir DNA virusudur.
B19 of the family Parvoviridae is the etiologic agent responsible for a wide range of clinical syndromes, such as erythema infectiosum, postinfection arthropathies, fetal hydrops, transient aplastic crises in patients with hemolytic anemia, and chronic infections, mainly in immunocompromised patients.
Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) is a small nonenveloped virus in the Parvoviridae family.
Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), a new member of the Bocavirus genus of the family Parvoviridae, was discovered in 2005 by large-scale sequencing in nasopharyngeal samples from children (1).
On the basis of phylogenetic analyses, we propose this virus as the prototype member of a second species in the Parvoviridae genus Amdovirus.
Transmission routes of human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), a recently discovered member of the Parvoviridae family (1), are not fully understood; studies have suggested that PARV4 is transmitted predominantly through the parenteral route (2,3).
A new member of family Parvoviridae, human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), was identified in plasma of an injection drug user (IDU) with unexplained fatigue, headaches, fever, night sweats, nausea, and diarrhea (1).
Genetic characterization of the complete genome sequence of the virus showed a distant relationship to existing genera within the family Parvoviridae, although viruses showing 61%-63% sequence similarity to PARV4 have recently been described in pigs and cows (2), together likely meriting the designation of a new genus within the family.