partogram

(redirected from Partograph)

par·to·gram

(par'tō-gram),
Graph of labor parameters of time and dilation with alert and action lines to prompt intervention if the curve deviates from expected.
[L. partus, childbirth, + -gram]

par·to·gram

(pahr'tō-gram)
Graph of labor parameters of time and dilation with alert and action lines to prompt intervention if the curve deviates from expected.
Synonym(s): Friedman curve, labor curve.
[L. partus, childbirth, + -gram]

partogram

(part′ŏ-gram″)
In obstetrics, a graphical representation of labor that in a healthy delivery results in the birth of a child.

Patient care

The parameters recorded on the graph include changes in fetal heart rate, rate of dilation of the maternal cervix, and rate of fetal descent. These data can be compared with known norms to help identify delays in the expected progress of labor and improve intrapartum care.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of spontaneous labour with induced labour in nulliparous women using modified WHO partograph. Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet & Gynecol 2016;5(11):4005-8.
Furthermore, it highlighted that there is insufficient evidence to support routine administration of intravenous fluids and antispasmodics during labor and that more evidence is needed regarding delayed admission until active labor and use of the partograph (19).
Topics included were maternal and newborn resuscitation; early newborn care (recognition and management of prematurity, hypoglycaemia and hypothermia); communication triage and referral; management of shock and the unconscious patient; recognition and management of severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia; recognition, prevention and management of obstetric haemorrhage; sepsis; use of the partograph; recognition and management of obstructed labour; ability to perform assisted vaginal delivery (ventouse delivery); manual removal of retained placenta and manual vacuum aspiration for retained products of conception; recognition and management of other obstetric emergencies (breech delivery, cord prolapse, twin delivery, shoulder dystocia); and managing difficult caesarean sections.
Follow-up labour was performed by midwives and obstetricians, and knowledge concerning the labour was recorded in the partograph recommended by the Ministry of Health.
Unqualified personnel were found to provide institutional maternity care in up to 59% of all deliveries, and a number of life-saving clinical practices such as partograph use for monitoring labor, screening for pre-eclampsia/eclampsia and active management of the third stage of labor were rarely observed.
Likewise, institutions A and C had low compliance for behaviour number 2 ("initiating the Partograph") and 11 ("the presence of a companion is allowed").
World Health Organization partograph in management of labour.
The partograph was available in only 18.3% of all the facilities visited and also present in a higher proportion of the secondary health care facilities.
Partograph is an important tool to detect deviation from normal labour, and early referral helps in prevention of such castrotrophe.
Likewise, submit the parturient to repeated vaginal examination, besides being extremely inconvenient, can facilitates the possibility of puerperal infection and it is a not justified care, once the partograph use facilitates the effective control of the labor evolution.
The conference entitled The Role of Midwives in Saving Women's Lives included the following topics: The use of partograph as a decision-making tool in the hands of midwives for monitoring progress of labour; Safe abortion and post abortion care and role of midwives; neonatal resuscitation; role of midwives at home and hospital; and mother-to-child transmissions and role of midwives.

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