trans fat

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trans fat

(trăns)
n.
1. A trans fatty acid.
2. Trans fatty acids considered as a group.

trans fat

An unsaturated fat containing a trans—i.e., the carbon moieties on the two sides of the double bond point in opposite directions—(E)- isomer. Trans fats (TFs) are not found in nature; minimal TFs are present in animal fats. TFs are abundant in margarines, frying fats and shortenings, and are formed when polyunsaturated fat-rich vegetable and marine oils and vegetable shortenings are “hardened” by partial hydrogenation, producing fats with a firmness and consistency desired by both food manufacturers and consumers. The most abundant TF is elaidic acid and its isomers, which are 18-carbon molecules with one double bond.

TFs comprise 6 to 8% of the daily per capita consumption of fat in developed nations; health experts recommend reduction of TFs to trace amounts, as increased dietary TFs result in increased total and LDL-cholesterol, reduced HDL-cholesterol and an increased risk of coronary artery disease.

trans fat

A fat derived from the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils. Examples include vegetable shortening and margarine. Studies have associated trans-fat consumption with an increased risk for coronary artery disease.
See also: fat
References in periodicals archive ?
But the small print reveals a mixture of sugar, cream cheese, partially hydrogenated vegetable shortening (made of soybean, palm kernel, and coconut oils), water, flour, milk, cocoa, margarine (made of partially hydrogenated soybean oil and water), and a couple of dozen gums, flavorings, and preservatives.
Jeffrey Gross Marketing Research conducted a study with 170 adults and 179 teenagers and found that french fries prepared using the new canola oil were equally preferred to fries prepared using partially hydrogenated soybean oil.
Partially hydrogenated soybean oil, low linolenic soybean oil, low linolenic canola oil, and regular canola oil all passed the discard point at day six after 48 hours of frying.
In addition to its health attributes, fry studies have shown that Natreon(TM) canola oil outperforms partially hydrogenated soybean oil in stability, fry life, reduced polar compound formation, and important sensory attributes.
The coating (sugar, chocolate, coconut oil, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, cocoa butter, milkfat, soy lecithin, and natural and artificial flavors) will coat a lot more than just the bar.
A consumer product study of 170 adults and 179 teenagers conducted by Jeffrey Gross Marketing Research found that french fries prepared using the new Dow AgroSciences canola oil were equally preferred to fries prepared using today's commonly used frying oil, partially hydrogenated soybean oil.
Fry studies have shown that Natreon, a non-hydrogenated oil, outperforms partially hydrogenated soybean oil in stability, fry life, reduced polar compound formation, nutritional quality of food, and all sensory attributes.
Even though the topping is probably butterless, its partially hydrogenated soybean oil adds both saturated and trans fat.
The artificial colors and flavors and the partially hydrogenated soybean oil, for example.

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