parthenolide


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parthenolide

Pharmacognosy
A natural sesquiterpene lactone found in feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), which has a variety of in vitro activities:
• Inhibition of serotonin and prostaglandins, which may explain feverfew’s efficacy in treating migraines; 
• Induces apoptosis, killing the stem cells that give rise to acute myeloid leukaemia;
• Blocks Leishmania amazonensis;
• Interferes with microtubule activity;
• Anti-inflamatory; and
• Analgesic.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We were interested in finding out more about the potential of parthenolide. With expertise from colleagues in the School of Chemistry we've been able to demonstrate that this compound shows real promise."
"It's a clear demonstration that parthenolide has the potential to progress from the flower bed into the clinic."
Researchers said the parthenolide compound, found in its leaves, could be key to cancer treatments after it was modified to attack tumours.
Prof John Fossey said: "This is important because we have shown a way of producing parthenolide that could make it much more accessible and also because we've been able to improve its 'drug-like' properties to kill cancer cells.
The compound the Birmingham team were investigating is called parthenolide and was identified by scientists as having anti-cancer properties several years ago.
Parthenolide sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to trail by inducing the expression of death receptors through inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 activation J Cell Physiol.
This activity arises from a compound, parthenolide, which produces a similar effect to cortisone.
(67) The prominent active constituents of feverfew are sesquiterpene lactones, namely parthenolide, which possesses antisecretory, anti-inflammatory, and antispasmodic actions.
Fu et al., "Parthenolide ameliorates concanavalin A-induced acute hepatitis in mice and modulates the macrophages to an anti-inflammatory state," International Immunopharmacology, vol.
PEG-PE micelles prepared from conjugates of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) have a core-shell structure which can encapsulate hydrophobic drugs such as paclitaxel, parthenolide, tamoxifen, campotheicin, and budesonide [11].
Haloperidol, chlorpromazine, MG-132, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), aprotinin, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), [beta]-mercaptoethanol, brilliant blue G-colloidal concentrate, Brij 35 solution, diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC), dithiothreitol (DTT), N-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-N -(2-ethanesulfonic acid) (HEPES), leupeptin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Escherichia coli, serotype 0127: B8), parthenolide, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) were purchased from Sigma-Aldrich (St.