spondylolysis

(redirected from Pars defect)
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Related to Pars defect: Pars interarticularis defect

spondylolysis

 [spon″dĭ-lol´ĭ-sis]
the breaking down of a vertebra. adj., adj spondylolyt´ic.

spon·dy·lol·y·sis

(spon'di-lol'i-sis),
Degeneration or deficient development of a portion of the vertebra; commonly involves the pars interarticularis, which can result in a spondylolithesis.
[spondylo- + G. lysis, loosening]

spondylolysis

/spon·dy·lol·y·sis/ (spon″dil-ol´ĭ-sis) the breaking down of a vertebra.

spon·dy·lol·y·sis

(spon'di-lol'i-sis)
Degeneration or deficient development of the articulating part of a vertebra.
[spondylo- + G. lysis, loosening]

spondylolysis

A symptomless congenital deficiency of bone in the arch of the 5th or 4th lumbar vertebra disorder of the spine. The arch is formed of soft fibrous tissue and there is a weak link with adjacent vertebrae so that the condition of SPONDYLOLISTHESIS may occur.

spondylolysis

the breaking down of a vertebra.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eingorn and Pizzutillo4 reported that wire fixation, which involves the wiring of the transverse processes and spinous processes of the involved levels, was effective in treating a patient with bilateral pars defects at L3 and L4.
They reported the results of seven patients with multi-level spondylolysis; five patients had pars defects at two levels bilaterally, while two patients had pars defects at three levels bilaterally.
Six patients with bilateral pars defects at 2 levels were treated with this surgical technique.
Consequently, we chose to attempt a direct repair of the pars defects at the L3 level in spite of the patient's age, in the hope of preserving lumbar motion.
3-8) This case report describes a unique approach to the treatment of a patient with bilateral pars defects at L3, L4, and L5.
He concluded that trauma is an important factor in producing multiple pars defects in a single patient, but that genetics may play a role as well.
Eingorn and Pizzutillo (4) reported the case of an 18-year-old female with pars defects at L2, L3, and L4.
Not commonly associated with footballers, Thomas, in lay-man's terms, effectively nut-crackered his own vertebrae having already had them weakened by the actual Pars Defect, which can affect people for years without any traces of pain or detection.
It's called Pars Defect - it's common and most people don't know they have it and it can flare up from an old injury or a new one.

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