Park


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Park

(park),
Henry, British surgeon, 1745-1831. See: Park aneurysm.

Park

(park),
William H., U.S. bacteriologist, 1863-1939. See: Park-Williams fixative.

PARK

Cardiology A clinical trial–Post-Angioplasty Restenosis Ketanserin that evaluated ketanserin in preventing restenosis post PCTA in Pts with CAD. See Coronary artery disease, Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty Ophthalmology See Photorefractive astigmatic keratectomy, see there.

Patient discussion about Park

Q. Is forgetting where you parked your car a sign of a memory problem? Is forgetting where you parked your car a sign of a memory problem? Should you be concerned and consult your doctor about it?

A. This is a common concern that adults voice. However, I wouldn’t be concerned if it is just that. Forgetting where you parked your car is more a problem of inattention than of memory. Adults compared to the young are less good at Divided Attention. They are not as good at simultaneously thinking about an issue and paying attention to where they parked their car. They tend not to pay attention to where they are parked and not register this information in their mind in the first place. What you do not pay attention to, you cannot expect to remember. The solution is to make a habit of paying attention to where you are parked. Take a good look at the surroundings before you leave the parking lot and then you will notice fewer incidence of the problem.

More discussions about Park
References in classic literature ?
The dusky houses about me stood faint and tall and dim; the trees towards the park were growing black.
But before the dawn my courage returned, and while the stars were still in the sky I turned once more towards Regent's Park. I missed my way among the streets, and presently saw down a long avenue, in the half-light of the early dawn, the curve of Primrose Hill.
And turning the corner by the open lodge-gates, he set off, stumping up the long avenue of black pine-woods that pointed in abrupt perspective towards the inner gardens of Pendragon Park. The trees were as black and orderly as plumes upon a hearse; there were still a few stars.
Over the black pine-wood came flying and flashing in the moon a naked sword--such a slender and sparkling rapier as may have fought many an unjust duel in that ancient park. It fell on the pathway far in front of him and lay there glistening like a large needle.
We went next to the wing on the right, which was built, by way of completing the wonderful architectural jumble at Blackwater Park, in the time of George the Second.
I was terribly afraid, from what I had heard of Blackwater Park, of fatiguing antique chairs, and dismal stained glass, and musty, frouzy hangings, and all the barbarous lumber which people born without a sense of comfort accumulate about them, in defiance of the consideration due to the convenience of their friends.
They were just returned into the wilderness from the park, to which a sidegate, not fastened, had tempted them very soon after their leaving her, and they had been across a portion of the park into the very avenue which Fanny had been hoping the whole morning to reach at last, and had been sitting down under one of the trees.
Norris, as they drove through the park. "Nothing but pleasure from beginning to end!
"Go to your homes," they said; and the word was passed from mouth to mouth, "There's going to be trouble." A chill of apprehension ran through the city, and men hurrying in the unwonted darkness across City Hall Park and Union Square came upon the dim forms of soldiers and guns, and were challenged and sent back.
After the smashing of the City Hall and Post-Office, the white flag had been hoisted from a tower of the old Park Row building, and thither had gone Mayor O'Hagen, urged thither indeed by the terror-stricken property owners of lower New York, to negotiate the capitulation with Von Winterfeld.
The good doctor shook his head after seeing her; to which visit Sir Pitt consented, as it could be paid without a fee; and she was left fading away in her lonely chamber, with no more heed paid to her than to a weed in the park.
Then came the illustrious Mungo Park, the friend of Sir Walter Scott, and, like him, a Scotchman by birth.