decay product

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decay product

An isotope formed during the decay of a radioactive material. Synonym: daughter product
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These may become parent isotopes to their own daughter isotopes.
If the amount of parent isotope in a sample equals half the original amount (N = 1/2 [N.sub.0]), then the age equals one half-life (t = [[tau].sub.1/2]).
ANSTO produces the parent isotope, Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), places it in a transport and storage device called a Generator and sends it to hospitals and medical centres in Australiaand internationally.
Prior to the start of the Congress, delegates had the opportunity to tour ANSTOs state-of-the art OPAL multipurpose reactor, which produces the most commonly used nuclear diagnostic agent, molybdenum-99 (the parent isotope of technetium-99m), and the Australian Synchrotron, which operates the Imaging and Medical beamline with the worlds widest synchrotron X-ray beam.
Mo-99 is the parent isotope of technetium?99m (Tc-99m), the most widely used radioisotope in medical diagnostic imaging.
Molybdenum-99 is the parent isotope of technetium-99m, the most extensively used radioisotope in medical diagnostic imaging.
Mo-99 is the parent isotope of technetium-99m (Tc-99m), the most widely used radioisotope in medical diagnostic imaging, used in approximately 80 percent of nuclear diagnostic imaging procedures, equating to about 50,000 medical procedures in the United States every day.
Mo-99 used in 80 percent of nuclear medicine processes globally is the parent isotope of Technetium-99.
Mo-99 is the parent isotope of technetium-99m, the most widely used radioisotope in medical diagnostic imaging, used in approximately 80 percent of nuclear diagnostic imaging procedures, equating to about 50,000 medical procedures in the United States every day.
The relative increase for each radiogenic isotope is a function of the decay rate of their radioactive parent isotopes [sup.238]U, [sup.235]U, and [sup.235]Th, respectively.

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