parenchyma

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Related to Parenchymal cells: connective tissue, stroma

parenchyma

 [pah-reng´kĭ-mah]
the essential or functional elements of an organ, as distinguished from its framework, which is called the stroma. adj., adj paren´chymal, parenchym´atous.
parenchyma of prostate glandular substance consisting of small compound tubulosaccular or tubuloalveolar glands, making up the bulk of the prostate; it is surrounded by muscular substance and permeated by muscular strands.
renal parenchyma the functional tissue of the kidney, consisting of the nephrons.

pa·ren·chy·ma

(pă-reng'ki-mă), [TA]
1. The distinguishing or specific cells of a gland or organ, contained in and supported by the connective tissue framework, or stroma.
2. The endoplasm of a protozoan cell.
3. In the lung, consists of the gas-exchanging portion, excluding the radiographically visible blood vessels and bronchi.
[G. anything poured in beside, fr. parencheō, to pour in beside]

parenchyma

/pa·ren·chy·ma/ (pah-reng´kĭ-mah) [Gr.] the essential or functional elements of an organ, as distinguished from its stroma or framework.paren´chymalparenchym´atous
renal parenchyma  the functional tissue of the kidney, consisting of the nephrons.

parenchyma

(pə-rĕng′kə-mə)
n.
1. Anatomy The tissue characteristic of an organ, as distinguished from associated connective or supporting tissues.
2. Botany A simple plant tissue, composed of thin-walled cells and forming the greater part of leaves, roots, the pulp of fruit, and the pith of stems.

pa·ren′chy·mal, par′en·chym′a·tous (păr′ĕn-kĭm′ə-təs) adj.

parenchyma

[pəreng′kimə]
Etymology: Gk, para + enchyma, infusion
the functional tissue or cells of an organ or gland, as distinguished from supporting or connective tissue.

pa·ren·chy·ma

(pă-rengk'i-mă) [TA]
1. The distinguishing or specific cells of a gland or organ, contained in and supported by the connective tissue framework, or stroma.
2. The endoplasm of a protozoan cell.
[G. anything poured in beside, fr. parencheō, to pour in beside]
Parenchymaclick for a larger image
Fig. 246 Parenchyma . Transverse section of cells.

parenchyma

  1. a tissue composed of parenchyma cells which are thin-walled ‘general purpose’ plant cells that often have a packing function. Parenchyma cells remain alive at maturity and can become meristematic, as in INTERFASCICULAR CAMBIUM (see SECONDARY THICKENING). See Fig. 246 .
  2. 2 the loose, vacuolated cells that form much of the body tissue of platyhelminths.
  3. 3 any specific organ cells apart from connective tissues and blood vessels.

parenchyma

cells characteristic of an organ, contained within and supported by the stroma

parenchyma

the essential or functional elements of an organ, as distinguished from its stroma or framework.
References in periodicals archive ?
The composition of parenchymal cells in the processed bamboo residues is estimated at almost 80 percent (by weight).
Two layers of thickening parenchymal cells included an###Fig.
Parenchymal cells have relatively thin primary cell walls; they are often isodiametric; that is, they have essentially the same diameter in all planes.
The underlying mechanism is believed to be related to both amiodarone's large volume of distribution, long tissue half-life, and its interference with the normal lipid degradation pathways in the alveolar macrophages and other pulmonary parenchymal cells.
Connective tissue and parenchymal cells cause remodelling that leads to collagenization and wound shrinkage.
Microvilli from parenchymal cells often completely occlude the canalicular lumen.
Besides the long terminal repeats, the extrachromosomal circles have previously demonstrated short-half life in replicating in the renal epithelial and parenchymal cells (Bruggeman et al.
Copper deposition occurs in hepatic parenchymal cells, the brain, the periphery of the iris, and the kidney.
The parenchymal cells of the paraganglia and other elements of the autonomic nervous system arise from neural crest cells.
Under normal conditions, excess iron is processed by cells of the reticuloendothelial system, whereas in hemochromatosis, iron is deposited directly into parenchymal cells of the liver, pancreas, heart, and other organs.
Cytokinins can be distinguished from auxins and gibberellins with a diagnostic test that involves the culture of tobacco parenchymal cells in a nutrient solution.