pareidolia


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pareidolia

(păr′ī-dō′lē-ə)
n.
The perception of a recognizable image or meaningful pattern where none exists or is intended, as the perception of a face in the surface features of the moon.

pareidolia

An obsolete term for the delusional or inappropriate interpretation of visual clues.
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References in periodicals archive ?
My aim, however, is not to rehearse a catalogue of modernist pareidolia but to acknowledge that pareidolic impulses may inform the writings of key modernists when they engage inkblots as sites of suspect creativity.
Given the number of religious figures who feature in media reports of pareidolia, we thought that it was very appropriate that our high-tech scanning equipment found one of history's most important scientists.
We perceive order that does not add up, relationships that do not exist, in a brilliant ignition of pareidolia, that special human quality allowing us to see unicorns in clouds and Madonna in frosted windows.
There is actually a scientific explanation for this apparent daftness called face pareidolia.
It has also been suggested pareidolia is at play - the brain's autth faat automatic reaction to trick the eye into seeing faces and familiar objects such as animal shapes in patterns, textures or clouds.
Pareidolia and apparitions link not only to '60s drug culture but to religious cults.
By definition, pareidolia is "the tendency to perceive a specific, often meaningful, image in a random or ambiguous visual pattern" ("pareidolia", 2015).
Como en el test de Rorscharch o en los fenomenos de pareidolia, vemos a traves de los lentes de nuestro pensamiento.
Para aproximarnos a "La tupida copa de un arbol" empleamos fuentes variopintas, lo que nos permitio abordar teorias, temas, conceptos y fenomenos como la mirada, la pareidolia, el voyeurismo, el exhibicionismo y los "espacios vacios.
Exhibitions COVENTRY 50 BISHOP STREET GALLERY: Pareidolia, works by nine artists, until September 14.
Another example of pareidolia is the famous "face on Mars" supposedly visible in pictures taken by NASA's Viking 1 orbiter in 1976.
Psychologists call this phenomenon Pareidolia - the willingness to recognize familiar shapes in abstract patterns.