parasomnia

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parasomnia

 [par″ah-som´ne-ah]
a category of primary sleep disorders in which abnormal events occur during sleep, due to inappropriately timed activation of physiological systems. Included are nightmare disorder, sleep terror disorder, and sleepwalking disorder. See also dyssomnia.

par·a·som·ni·a

(par'ă-som'nē-ă),
Any dysfunction associated with sleep, for example, somnabulism, pavor nocturnus, enuresis, or nocturnal seizures.

parasomnia

/para·som·nia/ (-som´ne-ah) a category of sleep disorders in which abnormal events occur during sleep, such as sleepwalking or talking; due to inappropriately timed activation of physiological systems.

parasomnia

(păr′ə-sŏm′nē-ə)
n.
Any of a group of sleep disorders characterized by unwanted behaviors or perceptions that occur during sleep or partial arousal from sleep, including sleepwalking, night terrors, and frequent nightmares.

parasomnia

Neurology
(1) A nonspecific term for any sleep-related disorder—e.g., enuresis, nightmares, somnambulism. 
(2) A nonspecific term for any sleep disorder; dyssomnia.
(3) Any sleep disorder caused by disease of the central nervous system.

parasomnia

Sleep disorders A dyssomnic event occurring during sleep, or induced or exacerbated by sleep–eg, sleepwalking. See Sleep disorder.

par·a·som·ni·a

(par'ă-som'nē-ă)
Any dysfunction associated with sleep (e.g., somnambulism, pavor nocturnus, enuresis, or nocturnal seizures).

Parasomnia

A primary sleep disorder in which the person's physiology or behaviors are affected by sleep, the sleep stage, or the transition from sleeping to waking.
Mentioned in: Sleep Disorders
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the most common type of parasomnia observed in children.
Zolpidem is preferred for insomnia because of its low risk for abuse and daytime sedation; however, it is associated with NREM parasomnias
The parasomnias describe conditions that cause abnormal behaviours such as sleepwalking, night terrors and REM sleep behaviour disorder (acting out of dreams).
NTis classified under parasomnias in the mentioned classification systems and is characterized with sudden attacks of fear associated with the increase in autonomic signs following crying and loud shouting during the first few hours of sleep during the delta stage (associated with the NREM period) (4).
Childhood parasomnias and psychotic experiences at age 12 years in a United Kingdom birth cohort.
Moreover, those who were bullied and bullied others (bully/victims) were most likely to have any parasomnia.
Although nightmares and obstructive sleep apnea were less common, those with nightmares or parasomnias were more likely to have mental disorders.
When blood fatty acid levels were evaluated, the researchers found an association with higher levels of DHA and less bedtime resistance, parasomnias, and total sleep disturbances.
Consequently routine PSG is not indicated in the clinical assessment of PTSD unless other sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea or parasomnias are suspected.
According to the study, it found that there is possible links between sleep and fatty acid status in healthy children, and that higher blood levels of the long-chain omega-3 DHA are significantly associated with better sleep, including less bedtime resistance, parasomnias and total sleep disturbance.