parasomnia

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parasomnia

 [par″ah-som´ne-ah]
a category of primary sleep disorders in which abnormal events occur during sleep, due to inappropriately timed activation of physiological systems. Included are nightmare disorder, sleep terror disorder, and sleepwalking disorder. See also dyssomnia.

par·a·som·ni·a

(par'ă-som'nē-ă),
Any dysfunction associated with sleep, for example, somnabulism, pavor nocturnus, enuresis, or nocturnal seizures.

parasomnia

/para·som·nia/ (-som´ne-ah) a category of sleep disorders in which abnormal events occur during sleep, such as sleepwalking or talking; due to inappropriately timed activation of physiological systems.

parasomnia

(păr′ə-sŏm′nē-ə)
n.
Any of a group of sleep disorders characterized by unwanted behaviors or perceptions that occur during sleep or partial arousal from sleep, including sleepwalking, night terrors, and frequent nightmares.

parasomnia

Neurology
(1) A nonspecific term for any sleep-related disorder—e.g., enuresis, nightmares, somnambulism. 
(2) A nonspecific term for any sleep disorder; dyssomnia.
(3) Any sleep disorder caused by disease of the central nervous system.

parasomnia

Sleep disorders A dyssomnic event occurring during sleep, or induced or exacerbated by sleep–eg, sleepwalking. See Sleep disorder.

par·a·som·ni·a

(par'ă-som'nē-ă)
Any dysfunction associated with sleep (e.g., somnambulism, pavor nocturnus, enuresis, or nocturnal seizures).

Parasomnia

A primary sleep disorder in which the person's physiology or behaviors are affected by sleep, the sleep stage, or the transition from sleeping to waking.
Mentioned in: Sleep Disorders
References in periodicals archive ?
Factors that predispose, prime and NREM parasomnias in adults: Clinical and forensic implications.
of Bologna, Italy) present the first publication on parasomnias to address many topics not previously covered in detail.
Parasomnias can be defined as abnormal movements or behaviours, including those that occur into sleep or during arousals from sleep, intermittent or episodic, or without disturbing the sleep architecture.
Modern hypnotic drugs may cause eating disorders, aggravate some parasomnias, induce somnambulism, and impair a person's ability to drive or operate machinery.
For an excellent review of the entire class of sleep problems in children, including parasomnias, fears, and nightmare disorders see Sadeh (2005).
Moreover, a retrospective study of youth with BP found that almost half of the children had sleep disturbances that were most often characterized by insomnia and parasomnias, and that many of these symptoms were apparent by age 3 (Faedda et al.
The book then addresses common sleep disorders such as insomnia, sleep-related movement disorders, sleep-related breathing disorders, narcolepsy, parasomnias, and circadian rhythm disturbances, each in a separate chapter.
Parasomnias usually occur during the first third of the night, and individuals have little memory of them.
These include parasomnias, or abnormal movements or behavior during sleep.
It's one of a group of sleep problems known as the parasomnias.
The International Classification of Sleep Disorders has divided them into four categories by possible cause: intrinsic sleep disorders, parasomnias, circadian rhythm sleep disorders, and extrinsic sleep disorders.
The types of disorders, causes of insomnias, parasomnias and their treatments are analyzed, with the additional review of treatments including pharmaceuticals, devices (continuous positive airway pressure or CPAP machines) and others (nutraceuticals, etc.