parasitoid

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par·a·si·toid

(par'ă-sī'toyd),
Denoting a feeding relationship intermediate between predation and parasitism, in which the parasitoid eventually destroys its host; refers especially to parasitic wasps (order Hymenoptera) the larvae of which feed on and finally destroy a grub or other arthropod host stung by the mother wasp before laying its egg(s) on the host.
[parasite + G. eidos, appearance]

parasitoid

(păr′ə-sĭ-toid′, -sī′toid)
n.
An organism, usually an insect, that lives on or in a host organism during some period of its development and eventually kills its host.

par′a·sit·oid′ adj.

parasitoid

any of the alternately parasitic and free-living wasps and flies, such as the ichneumon fly, whose larvae parasitize and often kill members of the host species.
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, the majority of Hymenoptera are parasitoids of herbivore Coleoptera, Diptera, Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera (Quicke, 1997a).
In some cases, parasitoids can enhance plant fitness by parasitizing herbivores that damage the seeds by feeding on them (Gomez and Zamora, 1994; Traveset, 1991).
radiata (ectoparasitoid) is the result of work conducted in Florida using populations of parasitoids obtained from China, Taiwan, and Vietnam (Hoy & Nguyen 2001; Rohrig 2010; Rohrig et al.
Native cynipid parasitoids are able to rapidly adapt to new exotic hosts; as a result host shift events may occur and even changing in parasitoid behaviour [8] showed how galls of invading cynipid species in Britain have become the main hosts of local parasitoid populations.
Therefore, it is fundamental to know the relationship suitable between number of parasitoids to be released in relation to the density of host eggs presented in the agroecosystem, and the host-egg age more favorable to parasitism, in order to determine the release intervals of the parasitoid in the field (Ko et al., 2014; Polanczyk, Pratissoli, Holtz, Pereira, & Furtado, 2007).
This findings are in accordance with those of Purcell et al.[19] who observed the effects of guava ripening on large quantity and parasitism ratio of oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) parasitoids.
In the laboratory studies conducted at 28 [+ or -] 2[degrees]C, it was observed that these parasitoids completed their life cycle between 23-27 days, and the surviving adult lived for 4-9 days (MANI & KRISHNAMOORTHY, 1989).
"This decline was due to significant increases in EAB larval parasitism, first by native parasitoids, then by T.
longicaudata under field conditions in southern Brazil, helped to motivate the present study aimed at evaluating the effect of releases of this parasitoid into populations of fruit flies and native parasitoids in loquat, peach, strawberry guava and persimmon trees in the city of Eldorado do Sul, RS, Brazil.