paraprotein

(redirected from Paraproteins)

paraprotein

 [par″ah-pro´tēn]
a normal or abnormal plasma protein appearing in large quantities as a result of some pathologic condition, now replaced in most contexts by the term m component.

par·a·pro·tein

(par'ă-prō'tēn),
1. A monoclonal immunoglobulin of blood plasma, observed electrophoretically as an intense band in γ, β, or α regions, due to an isolated increase in a single immunoglobulin type as a result of a clone of plasma cells arising from the abnormal rapid multiplication of a single cell. The finding of a paraprotein in a patient's serum indicates the presence of a proliferating clone of immunoglobulin-producing cells and may be seen in a variety of malignant, benign, or nonneoplastic diseases.
[para + protein, fr. G. protos, first]

paraprotein

/para·pro·tein/ (-pro´tēn) a normal or abnormal plasma protein appearing in large quantities as a result of a pathological condition; term now largely replaced by M component.

paraprotein

[-prō′tēn]
any of the incomplete monoclonal immunoglobulins that occur in plasma cell disorders.

M spike

A term of art referring to a zone of increased concentration of a monoclonal immunoglobulin when seen by serum electrophoresis.

par·a·pro·tein

(par'ă-prō'tēn)
1. A monoclonal immunoglobulin of the blood plasma, produced by a clone of plasma cells arising from the abnormal rapid multiplication of a single cell. Paraprotein in serum may be seen in various malignant, benign, or nonneoplastic diseases.
2. Synonym(s): monoclonal immunoglobulin.
[para + protein, fr. G. protos, first]

paraprotein

An abnormal plasma protein such as the MONOCLONAL immunoglobulin in MYELOMATOSIS.

Paraprotein

M-protein; abnormal immunoglobulin produced in multiple myeloma.
Mentioned in: Multiple Myeloma

paraprotein

immunoglobulin produced by a clone of neoplastic plasma cells proliferating abnormally, e.g. myeloma proteins and cryoglobulins. See also monoclonal gammopathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paraproteins can adversely affect various instruments and methodologies.
For Total Immunoglobulins (IgG, M, A), IgG and IgA subclasses, Paraproteins and Functional Immunoglobulins
amyloidosis/myeloma cast nephropathy due to paraproteins from plasma cell dyscrasias or lymphoplasmacytic proliferations
56) The paraproteins produced by plasma cells in our patients were either IgG or IgA, but among the published reports, several cases include IgM-producing PCM, (26,36,44,45) and patients with CLL can produce IgM paraprotein at levels overlapping those of LPL.
Further investigations revealed that Bence Jones proteins were absent from the urine, and an analysis of serum immunoglobulins found no monoclonal paraproteins.
The 13 chapters on therapeutic drug monitoring discuss such issues as monitoring free drug concentration; analytical techniques for measuring concentrations of therapeutic drugs in biological fluids; the pre-analytical phase of drug testing; the effect of hemolysis, high bilirubin, lipemia, paraproteins, and system factors on therapeutic drug monitoring; interferences with measurement of anticonvulsants; pitfalls in measuring antidepressant drugs; immunosuppressive drugs; therapeutic monitoring in HIV/AIDS; pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine; interference of heterophilic and other antibodies in measurement of therapeutic drugs by immunoassays; and drug-herb and drug-food interactions and their impact on drug monitoring.
explain the effects of paraproteins on platelet function.
Patients were evaluated by reductions in levels of paraproteins, which are validated clinical markers associated with corresponding reduction in bone marrow plasmacystosis, recovery from anemia/thrombocytopenia and uninvolved immunoglobulins.
Reductions in paraproteins were associated with corresponding reduction in bone marrow plasmacytosis, recovery from anemia/thrombocytopenia and uninvolved immunoglobulins.
IgG and IgM paraproteins have been suggested to interfere with total bilirubin assays, especially on Roche analyzers, by forming precipitants (1-5).
Because of the unique physicochemical characteristics of paraproteins, different patients with the same IgM levels can have strikingly divergent viscosities.