paraprotein

(redirected from Paraproteins)

paraprotein

 [par″ah-pro´tēn]
a normal or abnormal plasma protein appearing in large quantities as a result of some pathologic condition, now replaced in most contexts by the term m component.

par·a·pro·tein

(par'ă-prō'tēn),
1. A monoclonal immunoglobulin of blood plasma, observed electrophoretically as an intense band in γ, β, or α regions, due to an isolated increase in a single immunoglobulin type as a result of a clone of plasma cells arising from the abnormal rapid multiplication of a single cell. The finding of a paraprotein in a patient's serum indicates the presence of a proliferating clone of immunoglobulin-producing cells and may be seen in a variety of malignant, benign, or nonneoplastic diseases.
[para + protein, fr. G. protos, first]

paraprotein

/para·pro·tein/ (-pro´tēn) a normal or abnormal plasma protein appearing in large quantities as a result of a pathological condition; term now largely replaced by M component.

paraprotein

[-prō′tēn]
any of the incomplete monoclonal immunoglobulins that occur in plasma cell disorders.

M spike

A term of art referring to a zone of increased concentration of a monoclonal immunoglobulin when seen by serum electrophoresis.

par·a·pro·tein

(par'ă-prō'tēn)
1. A monoclonal immunoglobulin of the blood plasma, produced by a clone of plasma cells arising from the abnormal rapid multiplication of a single cell. Paraprotein in serum may be seen in various malignant, benign, or nonneoplastic diseases.
2. Synonym(s): monoclonal immunoglobulin.
[para + protein, fr. G. protos, first]

paraprotein

An abnormal plasma protein such as the MONOCLONAL immunoglobulin in MYELOMATOSIS.

Paraprotein

M-protein; abnormal immunoglobulin produced in multiple myeloma.
Mentioned in: Multiple Myeloma

paraprotein

immunoglobulin produced by a clone of neoplastic plasma cells proliferating abnormally, e.g. myeloma proteins and cryoglobulins. See also monoclonal gammopathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the HIV-negative group, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA paraproteins and myeloma light-chain disease were mainly seen, while in the HIV-positive group only IgG paraproteins were found (Table 5).
For Total Immunoglobulins (IgG, M, A), IgG and IgA subclasses, Paraproteins and Functional Immunoglobulins
Neuroendocrine: Carcinoids, paragangliomas Retina Retinoblastoma (neuroectoderm) Elastin Elastofibroma Amyloid Amyloidosis (Wilks disease): Amyloid deposition in several organs depending on the subtype; most commonly due to paraproteins (immunoglobulins from PCN) Calcium phosphate Benign: Osteomas, osteoblastomas, odontomas Malignant: Osteosarcomas, ameloblastomas Unknown Intrinsic type Benign or indeterminate: Scars, fibrosis, I collagen color?
There are a number of substances that have been reported to interfere with spectrophotometric methods for the measurement of total calcium including hemolysis, icterus, lipemia, paraproteins, magnesium, and gadolinium in contrast agents (4).
Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and other entities associated with monoclonal paraproteins
Based on these results, the authors considered 2D-gel electrophoresis has higher sensitivity and resolution of the IgD paraproteins than the conventional gel electrophoresis (14).
7) However, with the use of serum free light chain (FLC) assays, monoclonal FLC appear to be the most commonly detected paraproteins in CLL.
The disease results in the accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow leading to the over-production of monoclonal immunoglobulins, referred to as paraproteins and monoclonal free light chains, both of which can be detected in blood or urine and can cause organ and tissue damage (Mcguire & Williams, 2011; Smith & Yong, 2013).
amyloidosis/myeloma cast nephropathy due to paraproteins from plasma cell dyscrasias or lymphoplasmacytic proliferations
Rarely, paraproteinemias can develop similar lesions (known as necrobiotic xanthogranuloma) that are associated with elevated blood levels of paraproteins.
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia with associated lambda-light-chain and IgG lambda paraproteins simulating a biclonal gammopathy.
Further investigations revealed that Bence Jones proteins were absent from the urine, and an analysis of serum immunoglobulins found no monoclonal paraproteins.