Parapoxvirus

(redirected from Parapox virus)

Par·a·pox·vi·rus

(par'ă-poks'vī'rŭs),
The genus of viruses (family Poxviridae) that includes the contagious ecthyma of sheep, bovine papular stomatitis, and paravaccinia viruses. They possess the nucleoprotein antigen common to all viruses included in the family but differ from other poxviruses in morphology (for example, virions are smaller and have thicker external coats) and by not multiplying in embryonated eggs.

Parapoxvirus

/Para·pox·vi·rus/ (-poks´vi-rus) parapoxviruses; a genus of viruses comprising viruses of ungulates, including those causing orf and paravaccinia.

Parapoxvirus

(par″ă-poks′vī″rŭs) [ para- + poxvirus]
A genus of very large DNA viruses that primarily infect ungulates such as deer and cattle. Transmission to humans occasionally occurs, e.g., when farmers, hunters, and ranchers butcher or dress animals.

Parapoxvirus

a genus of viruses in the family Poxviridae.

Parapoxvirus infection
includes bovine papular stomatitis, contagious ecthyma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specialist research carried out by the University of Liverpool discovered that an adult native red that contracted the fatal disease - called parapox virus - fought it off and lived.
The parapox virus is carried by grey squirrels - which are immune to it - but it is highly contagious and passes on to the reds, which have no immunity from it.
The return of the Parapox virus is a blow to efforts to rebuild Ainsdale and Formby's population after reds were decimated by the disease three years ago.
That's bad enough, but greys also carry parapox virus, which rarely harms them, but is lethal to reds.
Dr Colin McInnes, of the Moredun Institute in Scotland, is carrying out research on the role of the parapox virus in the decline of the red squirrel.
Thousands of the animals have been wiped out by the parapox virus, which is spread by the larger grey squirrels, who are immune.
Once widespread in woodland throughout Britain, the red squirrel population is now in steep decline, mainly due to the spread of grey squirrels which carry the parapox virus.
Once widespread in woodland throughout Britain, the red squirrel population is now in decline, mainly due to the spread of grey squirrels which carry the parapox virus.
The Lancashire Wildlife Trust is urging people to be vigilant after evidence of the Parapox Virus was discovered on Sefton's coast.
Preliminary results showed the animals - which both had lesions - had not had the deadly Parapox virus, which it is feared could wipe out the local colony if it did hit Anglesey.
Dr Colin McInnes, principal research virologist at the More-dun Institute in Scotland, is carrying out research on the role of the parapox virus in the decline of the red squirrel.
They also carry a disease, parapox virus, which is deadly to the reds.