delusional disorder

(redirected from Paranoid delusion)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Paranoid delusion: paranoid schizophrenia, paranoia

delusional disorder

 
a mental disorder marked by well-systematized, logically consistent delusions with no other psychotic feature. There are six subtypes on the basis of the predominant delusional theme: persecutory, jealous, erotomanic, somatic, grandiose, and mixed. See also individual subtypes under delusion.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·lu·sion·al dis·or·der

a severe mental disorder characterized by the presence of delusions. The delusions may be related to paranoid, grandiose, somatic, or erotic themes.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

delusional disorder

DSM IV–297.1 Psychiatry A mental disorder characterized by the presence of one or more nonbizarre delusions that persist for more than one month in a person who has not ever had a symptom presentation meeting Criterion A for schizophrenia Types Erotomanic, grandiose, jealous, persecutory, somatic, mixed, unspecified. Cf Schizophrenia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

de·lu·sion·al dis·or·der

(dē-lūzhŭn-ăl dis-ōrdĕr)
Severe mental illness characterized by the presence of delusions; may be related to paranoid, grandiose, somatic, or erotic themes.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Delusional disorder

Individuals with delusional disorder suffer from long-term, complex delusions that fall into one of six categories: persecutory, grandiose, jealousy, erotomanic, somatic, or mixed.
Mentioned in: Psychosis
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In these cases, particularly when there is considerable functional impairment, family physicians should make simple and direct inquiries concerning the possibility that the patient is experiencing paranoid delusions ("Have there been times when you felt that people were trying to harm you?") or auditory hallucinations ("Have there been times when you heard things that others could not hear?").
A patient with schizophrenia with paranoid delusions usually experiences auditory hallucinations, such as voices threatening persecution or harm.
economy," it said in an editorial headlined "Protectionism symptom of paranoid delusions".
When the patient developed paranoid delusions, the father initially drew away from her.
Are Lauren's beliefs paranoid delusions that can be fixed through additional treatment, or is there a more sinister reason the government took interest in a girl who believed everything anyone said?
The inquest heard Mr Lam was "irritable, confrontational and sexually inappropriate" during his stay and was assessed as "a risk of harm to others, particularly his family" who featured in his paranoid delusions. He was granted escorted leave, and one of those occasions was on June 25, when he went to the shops with a carer.
His barrister Andrew Semple said his client had an "unedifying" criminal record but added that the "extremely unusual" incident in Scarborough was linked to Furneaux's borderline personality disorder and paranoid delusions linked to drug use.
Consequential positioning of paranoid delusions as decontextualised, objective phenomenon indicative of individual internal pathology has further created theoretical confusion and fuelled deep-seated philosophical debates regarding the nature of perception, reality and meaning in human distress (Szasz, 1974; Parker et al., 1999; Bentall, 2003).
"He had paranoid delusions and was convinced his life was in danger from agents of Birmingham Education Authority.
At his original trial, a psychiatrist said Ward suffered from a psychotic disorder that caused him to "suffer paranoid delusions such that he believes there might be a conspiracy against him and that people might be after him or trying to harm him," according to court documents.
[1, 9] Patient though he had classical paranoid delusions against his family and neighbours, did not express delusions regarding food, for example food being poisoned or feeling that he was being drugged through his food which is a regular phenomenon in paranoid schizophrenics.
Hussey told reporters after that arraignment that his client was suffering from a mental illness and appeared to have been experiencing "paranoid delusions'' at the time of the alleged attack on Mr.