paramedic

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paramedic

 [par″ah-med´ik]
a person trained to manage the emergency care of sick or injured persons during transport to a hospital, including administration of injections and intravenous fluids, reading of electrocardiograms, and performance of defibrillation and other advanced life-support measures if ordered by a physician. See also emergency medical technician.

par·a·med·ic

(par'ă-med'ik),
A person trained and certified to provide emergency medical care.

paramedic

(păr′ə-mĕd′ĭk)
n.
A person who is trained to give emergency medical treatment or assist medical professionals.

paramedic (medic)

[-med′ik]
Etymology: Gk, para + L, medicina, art of healing
a person who acts as an assistant to a physician or in place of a physician until the physician is available. paramedical, adj.

paramedic

As defined in the UK, a senior, and often the first, ambulance service healthcare professional at the scene of an accident or medical emergency. Paramedics may work alone—when deployed in a car, motorbike or bicycle—or with the support of an emergency care assistant or ambulance technician—if in an emergency van—and field triage a patient, resuscitate, provide advanced life support or stabilise him or her using the tools at their disposal, including defibrillators, spinal and traction splints, IV drips, oxygen and drugs.

Entry requirements
The traditional, experience-based route to becoming a paramedic (grandfather system) is no longer open to new entrants. Paramedics now either enter through a student paramedic position with an ambulance service trust, or attend an approved full-time course in paramedic science at a university. Courses are often modular with flexible entry and exit points, depending upon the candidate’s academic qualifications and relevant experience, and last from 2 years (full time) to 5 years (part time). Training comprises both theory and practical clinical experience, including several weeks in various hospital departments. Much of the training of paramedics is carried out under the supervision of senior doctors.

paramedic

A health professional certified to perform advanced life support procedures–eg, intubation, defibrillation and administration of drugs under a physician's direction; paramedics provide urgent care from an emergency vehicle or air service; in contrast, EMTs can only perform basic life-support. Cf EMT, Physicians' assistant, Physician extender.

pre·hos·pi·tal pro·vid·er

(prē-hos'pi-tăl prŏ-vī'dĕr)
One who provides care in case of medical emergency or trauma.
Synonym(s): emergency medical technician, paramedic.

paramedic

Any health-care worker other than a doctor, nurse, or dentist. The ranks of the paramedics include trained ambulance personnel, first aiders, laboratory technicians, PHYSIOTHERAPISTS, OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS, ORTHOPTISTS and RADIOGRAPHERS. See also PROFESSIONS ALLIED TO MEDICINE.

par·a·med·ic

(par'ă-med'ik)
A person trained and certified to provide emergency care.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paramedics will join Dentists, Medical Practitioners, Nurses, Midwives, Occupational Therapists, Optometrists, Osteopaths, Pharmacists, Physiotherapists, Podiatrists, Psychologists, Chiropractors, Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioners in the National Scheme.
A specialised academy will play an important role in developing the skills of paramedics in the country, especially Emiratis", said Al Darrai, adding that the
Two ambulances, a paramedic area support officer and a community paramedic attended.
Paul Fell, consultant paramedic at NEAS said: "This is great news for the patient and the paramedic profession.
The move is part of West Midlands Ambulance Service's Make Ready project with new teams of advanced paramedics, a new network of community ambulance stations and schemes in Shipston-on-Stour, Kenilworth and Stratford in the process of being set up.
The concept developed in Canada, Australia and New Zealand, where paramedics help treat non-emergency cases to prevent health issues from becoming more serious.
Adding fuel to the fire, a recent Ontario's firefighters association campaign advertising firefighters as experts in emergency medical care has outraged the province's paramedics association which launched a counter-campaign.
When I used to tell people what I was studying, they would either ridicule me or ask me if it was a wise choice to choose paramedics as a career.
If you are training as a paramedic by taking a foundation degree, DipHE or degree, you will attend university on a full/part time basis for between two and five years, while also attached to an ambulance service.
The department's new certified paramedics are Richard Scanlon, Scott Benoit, Lyle McKay, Brian Ceccarelli
Department of Labor, the median annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of EMTs and paramedics in May 2004 were between $23,130 and $27,720, although the highest 10 percent earned more than $43,240.