parallax

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parallax

 [par´ah-laks]
an apparent displacement of an object due to change in the observer's position.

par·al·lax

(par'ă-laks),
1. The apparent displacement of an object that follows a change in the position from which it is viewed.
2.
[G. alternately, fr. par-allassō, to make alternate, fr. allos, other]

par·al·lax

(par'ă-laks)
The apparent displacement of an object that follows a change in the position from which it is viewed.
[G. alternately, fr. par-allassō, to make alternate, fr. allos, other]

parallax 

Apparent displacement of an object viewed from two different points not on a straight line with the object.
binocular parallax The difference in angle subtended at each eye by an object that is viewed first with one eye and then with the other.
chromatic parallax Apparent lateral displacement of two monochromatic sources (e.g. a blue object and a red object) when observed through a disc with a pinhole placed near the edge of the pupil. When the pupil is centred on the achromatic axis (in some people the pinhole may have to be placed away from the centre of the pupil), the two images appear superimposed. The relative displacement of the two images becomes reversed when the pinhole is on the other side of that axis. This phenomenon is attributed to the chromatic aberration of the eye. See chromostereopsis; longitudinal chromatic aberration.
monocular parallax The apparent change in the relative position of an object when the eye is moved from one position to another.
motion parallax Apparent difference in the direction of movement or speed produced when the subject moves relative to his environment (Fig. P2). Example: when viewing the landscape through the window of a moving train near objects appear to move much more quickly than distant objects. See depth perception; stereopsis.
relative binocular parallax See stereoscopic visual acuity.
Fig. P2 An example of motion parallaxenlarge picture
Fig. P2 An example of motion parallax

par·al·lax

(par'ă-laks)
The apparent displacement of an object that follows a change in the position from which it is viewed.
[G. alternately, fr. par-allassō, to make alternate, fr. allos, other]
References in periodicals archive ?
(12) In The Parallax View, Zizek's extended engagement with
Zizek, The Parallax View, Cambridge, MIT, 2006, p305.
The Parallax View ranges from Kant to brain science, Derrida to the demilitarized zone in Korea, Sade to Star Wars.
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Lorenzo Semple Jr., creator of the '60s "Batman" TV series and scribe on thrillers "The Parallax View" and "Three Days of Condor," died March 28 in Los Angeles, according to reports.
Washington, March 29 ( ANI ): Lorenzo Semple Jr., who wrote the screenplays of 'The Parallax View', 'Three Days of the Condor, and 'Never Say Never Again', has passed away.
In Lisa Oppenheim's show "Parallax View" there was a constant tension between easily readable images and those that are utterly indecipherable and entropic.
The 1980s and the Reagan era brought a rollback of the kind of critical cinema we saw in the 1960s and 1970s, when films like "The Conversation," "Three Days of the Condor," "The Parallax View," "The Deer Hunter," "Apocalypse Now," and many others raised questions, in the wake of Vietnam and Watergate, about the military, the intelligence community, and many basic assumptions of American civilization.
According to Semple (whose cinematic espionage credits include screenplays for such classics as "Three Days of the Condor" and "The Parallax View" as well as the non-Eon Bond picture, "Never Say Never Again"): "The picture that Ratoff was making at the time for Fox, 'Abdullah's Harem,' was financed by wealthy Europeans, mostly Italians and some Egyptians, to get their assets out of Egypt, where the film was shooting.
Pakula's previous offerings, such as Klute, The Parallax View and All the President's Men, this is nevertheless an entertaining piece of hokum.
I intercut these two versions to create a kind of "parallax view." I wanted to create a formal expression of her parallel situation, a woman who is also a man with a penis.
Films such as "The Parallax View" suggested governments within governments, and above all the notion that all bets are off for democracy in the wake of the growth of secret spy agencies.