parahippocampal gyrus

(redirected from Parahippocampal place area)

gyrus

 [ji´rus] (pl. gy´ri) (L.)
one of the many convolutions of the surface of the cerebral hemispheres caused by infolding of the cortex, separated by fissures or sulci; called also cerebral gyrus.
angular gyrus one continuous anteriorly with the supramarginal gyrus.
annectent gyri various small folds on the cerebral surface that are too inconstant to bear specific names; called also gyri transitivi.
Broca's gyrus inferior frontal gyrus.
central gyrus, anterior precentral gyrus.
central gyrus, posterior postcentral gyrus.
cerebral gyrus gyrus.
Cerebral gyri. From Applegate, 1996.
cingulate gyrus (gyrus cin´guli) an arch-shaped convolution situated just above the corpus callosum.
frontal gyrus any of the three (inferior, middle, and superior) gyri of the frontal lobe.
fusiform gyrus one on the inferior surface of the hemisphere between the inferior temporal and parahippocampal gyri, consisting of a lateral (lateral occipitotemporal gyrus) and a medial (medial occipitotemporal gyrus) part.
hippocampal gyrus (gyrus hippocam´pi) one on the inferior surface of each cerebral hemisphere, lying between the hippocampal and collateral fissures; called also parahippocampal gyrus.
infracalcarine gyrus (lingual gyrus) one on the occipital lobe that forms the inferior lip of the calcerine sulcus and, together with the cuneus, the visual cortex.
marginal gyrus the middle frontal gyrus.
occipital gyrus any of the three (superior, middle, and inferior) gyri of the occipital lobe.
occipitotemporal gyrus, lateral the lateral portion of the fusiform gyrus.
occipitotemporal gyrus, medial the medial portion of the fusiform gyrus.
orbital gyri irregular gyri on the orbital surface of the frontal lobe.
parahippocampal gyrus hippocampal gyrus.
paraterminal gyrus a thin sheet of gray matter in front of and ventral to the genu of the corpus callosum.
postcentral gyrus the convolution of the frontal lobe immediately behind the central sulcus; the primary sensory area of the cerebral cortex; called also posterior central gyrus.
precentral gyrus the convolution of the frontal lobe immediately in front of the central sulcus; the primary motor area of the cerebral cortex; called also anterior central gyrus.
gyrus rec´tus a cerebral convolution on the orbital aspect of the frontal lobe.
supramarginal gyrus that part of the inferior parietal convolution which curves around the upper end of the fissure of Sylvius.
temporal gyrus any of the gyri of the temporal lobe, including inferior, middle, superior, and transverse temporal gyri; the more prominent of the latter (anterior transverse temporal gyrus) represents the cortical center for hearing.
gy´ri transiti´vi annectent gyri.
uncinate gyrus the uncus.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

par·a·hip·po·cam·pal gy·rus

[TA]
a long convolution on the medial surface of the temporal lobe, forming the lower part of the fornicate gyrus, extending from behind the splenium corporis callosi forward along the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus from which it is demarcated by the hippocampal fissure. The anterior extreme of the gyrus curves back on itself, forming the uncus, the major location of the olfactory cortex.
See also: entorhinal area.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

par·a·hip·po·cam·pal gy·rus

(par'ă-hip'ō-kam'păl jī'rŭs) [TA]
A long convolution on the medial surface of the temporal lobe, forming the lower part of the fornicate gyrus, extending from behind the splenium corporis callosi forward along the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus from which it is demarcated by the hippocampal fissure. The anterior extreme of the gyrus curves back on itself, forming the uncus, the major location of the olfactory cortex.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
When visual memory is the cause, the condition is known as 'topographagnosia.' Visual information about landmarks, buildings and spatial layout is encoded in the parahippocampal place area, which lies medial to the fusiform face area.
Affected brain regions included the left amygdala, medial prefrontal cortex and parahippocampal place area.
Such experiments revealed that the fusiform face area was activated to a greater degree when participants viewed painted portraits, while the parahippocampal place area was activated to a greater degree when participants viewed natural scenes.
OFC: orbitofrontal cortices; vmPFC: ventromedial prefrontal cortex; ACC: anterior cingulate; AMG: amygdala; aI: anterior insula; NAcc: nucleus accumbens; red parts: sensorimotor areas; M1: primary motor area; S1: primary somatosensory area; IPL: inferior parietal lobule; PMC: premotor cortex; orange parts: visual areas, part of the occipitotemporal cortex; EBA: extrastriate body area; MT: motion integration area; EV: early visual area; PPA: parahippocampal place area; pSTS: posterior superior temporal sulcus.
In the new study, the researchers found that IFJ coordinates with a brain region that processes faces, known as the fusiform face area (FFA), and a region that interprets information about places, known as the parahippocampal place area (PPA).
(5) For example, fMRI experiments showed activation in the face fusiform area (FFA) on both the right and left hemispheres of the brain in response to images of faces while the parahippocampal place area on both the right and left sides of the brain activates in response to places (fig.
Three examples of specialised areas are the fusiform face area (FFA), (16) parahippocampal place area (PPA) and lateral occipital complex (LOC).
Given that the non-sighted participants showed the same results, demonstrated that the parahippocampal place area receives spatial information from multiple senses.