paraesthesia

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par·es·the·si·a

(par'es-thē'zē-ă), Avoid the jargonistic use of the plural of this abstract noun to mean 'episodes or zones of paresthesia'.
A spontaneous abnormal usually nonpainful sensation (for example, burning, pricking); may be due to lesions of both the central and peripheral nervous systems.
Synonym(s): paraesthesia
[para- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]

paraesthesia

(păr′ĭs-thē′zhə)
n.
Variant of paresthesia.

par·es·the·si·a

(par'es-thē'zē-ă)
A subjective report of any abnormal sensation; could be experienced as numbness, tingling, or what is colloquially called "pins and needles."
Synonym(s): paraesthesia.
[para- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]

paraesthesia

Numbness or tingling of the skin. ‘Pins-and-needles’ sensation.

par·es·the·si·a

(par'es-thē'zē-ă) Avoid the jargonistic use of the plural of this abstract noun to mean 'episodes or zones of paresthesia.'
In dentistry, a temporary or permanent condition of prolonged numbness after effects of an injected local anesthetic have ceased; maybe caused by trauma to nerve sheath during injection, hemorrhage about that sheath, or administration of contaminated anesthetic.
Synonym(s): paraesthesia.
[para- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]
References in periodicals archive ?
A 69-year-old white woman presented with weakness, which had developed over a 10-14-day period, and complaints of numbness and paraesthesiae in the hands and feet.
This observation, together with the apparent ease of placement of the first epidural catheter and the absence of paraesthesiae during the procedure, led to the conclusion that the catheter had probably been severed by the Tuohy needle after it had been withdrawn approximately 6.5 cm.
(2) In one case of an accidental overdose of ritonavir the patient experienced tiredness, headache, dry mouth, circumoral paraesthesiae, dizziness and disequilibrium of gait, and an electrocardiogram revealed a prolonged QT interval.
The authors of this audit describe a detailed technique of avoiding intraneural injection by electrical stimulation at low currents and withdrawal of the needle in case of motor response (1); however, they ignore studies which found that a motor response cannot always be elicited with a nerve stimulator after a patient has reported paraesthesiae (9,10).
Human angiostrongyliasis is usually mild and self-limiting, and recovery takes place within a week, but paraesthesiae and muscular weakness may persist for years and represent chronic forms of the disease.