paradox

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Related to Paradoxy: paradoxical

par·a·dox

(par'ă-doks), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word to meaan simply 'something unusual or unexpected'.
That which is apparently, although not actually, inconsistent with or opposed to the known facts in any case.
[G. paradoxos, incredible, beyond belief, fr. doxa, belief]

paradox

Vox populi A thing that appears illogical or counterintuitive to that which is known to be correct. See Anion paradox, Asher's paradox paradox, C value paradox, Calcium paradox, French paradox, Glucose paradox, Grandfather paradox, Oxygen paradox, Sherman paradox.

par·a·dox

(par'ă-doks)
That which is apparently, although not actually, inconsistent with or opposed to the known facts in any case.
[G. paradoxos, incredible, beyond belief, fr. doxa, belief]

par·a·dox

(par'ă-doks)
That which is apparently, although not actually, inconsistent with or opposed to known facts in any case.
[G. paradoxos, incredible, beyond belief, fr. doxa, belief]
References in periodicals archive ?
It begins with a typology of paradoxy of five classifications, the ontological, the cosmological, the psychological, the axiological, and the logical.
However, the actual author's paradoxy in the Prologue and the title page clearly challenges the tidiness of such distinctions as "truth-telling" and "lie-telling" without thereby negating them.
In Adventures in Paradox, Charles Presberg contends the following two points: 1) although it caught on later there than in the rest of Europe, paradoxy was cultivated in Spain with an unsurpassed exuberance; 2) Cervantes' Don Quixote contains a compendium of Western paradoxy as well as many innovations in the field.
(This is, after all, a stage that follows his utter linguistic breakdown in act 4 [4.1.34-41].) In act 5, when he looks over the sleeping Desdemona and has murderous thoughts, Othello turns to paradoxy: Of Desdemona, he says, "So sweet was ne'er so fatal" (5.2.2 1), and after strangling her, yet sensing that she is "Not yet quite dead" (5.2.95), Othello muses, "I that am cruel am yet merciful.