paradox

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Related to Paradoxes: Time paradox

par·a·dox

(par'ă-doks), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word to meaan simply 'something unusual or unexpected'.
That which is apparently, although not actually, inconsistent with or opposed to the known facts in any case.
[G. paradoxos, incredible, beyond belief, fr. doxa, belief]

paradox

Vox populi A thing that appears illogical or counterintuitive to that which is known to be correct. See Anion paradox, Asher's paradox paradox, C value paradox, Calcium paradox, French paradox, Glucose paradox, Grandfather paradox, Oxygen paradox, Sherman paradox.

par·a·dox

(par'ă-doks)
That which is apparently, although not actually, inconsistent with or opposed to the known facts in any case.
[G. paradoxos, incredible, beyond belief, fr. doxa, belief]

par·a·dox

(par'ă-doks)
That which is apparently, although not actually, inconsistent with or opposed to known facts in any case.
[G. paradoxos, incredible, beyond belief, fr. doxa, belief]
References in periodicals archive ?
One can argue more systematically by noting that many self-referential paradoxes easily reduce to the liar (Sorensen 1988, pp.
But didn't Aristotle solve these paradoxes when he showed that there cannot be an actual infinite?
It is not new that time and paradoxes can be intertwined: for example, the Ross-Littlewood paradox [11] deals with time and infinity, but it is not directly related to this paper.
Critique: Exceptionally well written, organized and presented, "Puzzles, Paradoxes, Controversies, and the Global Economy" will prove an important and core addition to professional and academic library Global Economics reference collections and supplemental studies reading lists.
paradoxes might occur, but fail to predict whether the green paradox
Yes, these three paradoxes make up the most difficult dimensions of the election campaign facing Erdoy-an and the AKP, with just one month left until the elections.
Both paradoxes arise in different ways from the same philosophical error, the error of altruism.
The recurring theme is that paradoxes tend to crop up in the failure of language, or thought, to grasp reality.
The Merchant of Venice seems an especially apt example of Platt's thesis, offering as it does numerous paradoxes with no apparent resolution.
Like his paradoxes, Lando challenged the orthodoxies of church and court: "Lando's unwillingness to identify with any of the social groups of his world and his refusal to speak comme il faut to a courtly elite are a consequence of his radical religious creed: he speaks to those who wished to be saved" (24).
Through its ambiguities and paradoxes, the prologue cultivates an attitude of critical engagement, based on the reader's evolving awareness and reassessment of his responses to the text.