paradigm

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paradigm

 [par´ah-dīm]
a shared understanding among scientists or scholars working in a discipline regarding the important problems, structures, values, and assumptions determining that discipline.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

paradigm

An example, hypothesis, model, or pattern; a widely accepted explanation for a group of biomedical or other phenomena that become accepted as data accumulate to corroborate aspects of the paradigm's explanation or theory, as occurred in the 'central dogma' of molecular biology. See Central dogma, Paradigm shift.

PARADIGM

Endocrinology A clinical trial–Pramlintide for Amylin Replacement Adjunct for Diabetes in Glycemic Management
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

paradigm

1. A human being's mental model of the world, which may or may not conform to that of others but is often stereotypical.
2. In the philosophy of science, a general conception of the nature of scientific operation within which a particular scientific activity is undertaken. Paradigms are, of their nature, persistent and hard to change. Major advances in science-such, for instance, as the realization of the concept of the quantum or the significance of evolution in medicine-involve painful paradigmic shifts which some people, notably the older scientists, find hard to make.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Larry has a wealth of knowledge and experience in the property tax industry and has been a distinguished addition to our Dallas office, as well as our entire Paradigm Team, since he joined in 2015, said Fossey.
What should be said is that if potential words were not taken into account and the research allowed for actual words only, the picture of derivational paradigms would be completely different.
Nested within the organizational paradigm are smaller and smaller paradigms, hospital divisions and departments, for example.
Faulty Paradigm 5: Leadership is soft as mostly women take on those roles in informal settlements.
Without discounting the possibility of friendly cooperation, especially between heterodox schools, Stilwell takes combative competition between all paradigms to be the major mode of interaction: '...
Alternative positions regarding paradigms within the accounting academia:
The Newtonian paradigm is useful in situations that are predictable and subject to managerial control whereas the quantum paradigm is useful for understanding unfamiliar events in complex, turbulent environments, useful for leadership in interesting times .
(1980), "Paradigms, Metaphors, and Puzzle Solving in Organization Theory," Administrative Science Quarterly 25(4): 605-622.
The then President Turgut Ozal expressed the Imperial paradigm for the second time.
Population-ecology theory, institutional theory, resource dependency theory and organizational economics theory are explicitly and/or implicitly denying the structural-contingency paradigm which is defined as pro-managerial theory.
Chapter 2 redescribes, evaluates, and renames four paradigms of biblical studies that S.F.
Just as any paradigm analysis encourages an examination of the basic beliefs and assumptions that define and organize the nature of the world, a more specific consideration of health paradigms allows for the identification and deconstruction of the larger forces that shape approaches to health (Guba & Lincoln, 2005; Nelson, Lord, & Ochocka, 2001).