paradigm

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paradigm

 [par´ah-dīm]
a shared understanding among scientists or scholars working in a discipline regarding the important problems, structures, values, and assumptions determining that discipline.

paradigm

[per′ədīm, -dim]
a pattern that may serve as a model or example.

paradigm

An example, hypothesis, model, or pattern; a widely accepted explanation for a group of biomedical or other phenomena that become accepted as data accumulate to corroborate aspects of the paradigm's explanation or theory, as occurred in the 'central dogma' of molecular biology. See Central dogma, Paradigm shift.

PARADIGM

Endocrinology A clinical trial–Pramlintide for Amylin Replacement Adjunct for Diabetes in Glycemic Management

paradigm

1. A human being's mental model of the world, which may or may not conform to that of others but is often stereotypical.
2. In the philosophy of science, a general conception of the nature of scientific operation within which a particular scientific activity is undertaken. Paradigms are, of their nature, persistent and hard to change. Major advances in science-such, for instance, as the realization of the concept of the quantum or the significance of evolution in medicine-involve painful paradigmic shifts which some people, notably the older scientists, find hard to make.

paradigm

term introduced ca 1960 by the science-historian Kuhn; a widely followed way of approaching an area of research, deriving from a notable early achievement in the field and carrying forward both its experimental methodology and its theoretical outlook.

paradigm (parˑ··dīmˈ),

n a generally accepted model for making sense of phenomena in a given discipline at a particular time. When one paradigm is replaced by another, it is called a paradigm shift.

paradigm (par″ədīm),

n a model or pattern. The set of values or concepts that represent an accepted way of doing things within an organization or community.
paradigm shift,
n an adjustment in thinking that comes about as the result of new discoveries, inventions, or real-world experiences.

paradigm

a pattern of thought, a similarity of conceptualization.
References in periodicals archive ?
Weekend nights at the PV is proof of all that I have mentioned: most people get along, there are plenty of kooks and Barneys flossin' skate gear without a clue, but most importantly the notion of a dominant paradigm in skateboarding has no legs with which to stand on.
The Swiss timepiece paradigm was founded on the assumption that mechanical technology (e.
Burkan suggests seeking information outside one's field (benchmarking), understand personal and corporate paradigms and their obsolescence, and avoid the paralysis that stems from inaction.
The ability to affect change is a function of the paradigm that interprets operational response to market stress, according to Burkan.
The paradigm is a filter through which we view our competitive world," he said.
The old paradigm holds that "I'll believe it when I see it," or even more regressively, "I'll see it when I believe it," Burkan added.
These forward-looking statements can generally be identified as such because the context of the statement will include words, such as UTEK or Inverted Paradigms Corporation "expects," "should," "believes," "anticipates" or words of similar import.
FUSION64 customers will also be able to purchase the Nintendo 64 emulator board from Paradigm, who has been authorized by Nintendo as the only other source for these boards.
With this unique approach, Nintendo is leading the industry in responding to the developers call for more comprehensive 3D support," said Ron Toupal, president of Paradigm Simulation, Inc.
We will be referring authorized Nintendo 64 game developers to Paradigm Simulation for all of their hardware and software needs," added Lincoln.
Founded in 1990, Dallas-based Paradigm Simulation, Inc.