paradigm

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paradigm

 [par´ah-dīm]
a shared understanding among scientists or scholars working in a discipline regarding the important problems, structures, values, and assumptions determining that discipline.

paradigm

[per′ədīm, -dim]
a pattern that may serve as a model or example.

paradigm

An example, hypothesis, model, or pattern; a widely accepted explanation for a group of biomedical or other phenomena that become accepted as data accumulate to corroborate aspects of the paradigm's explanation or theory, as occurred in the 'central dogma' of molecular biology. See Central dogma, Paradigm shift.

PARADIGM

Endocrinology A clinical trial–Pramlintide for Amylin Replacement Adjunct for Diabetes in Glycemic Management

paradigm

1. A human being's mental model of the world, which may or may not conform to that of others but is often stereotypical.
2. In the philosophy of science, a general conception of the nature of scientific operation within which a particular scientific activity is undertaken. Paradigms are, of their nature, persistent and hard to change. Major advances in science-such, for instance, as the realization of the concept of the quantum or the significance of evolution in medicine-involve painful paradigmic shifts which some people, notably the older scientists, find hard to make.

paradigm

term introduced ca 1960 by the science-historian Kuhn; a widely followed way of approaching an area of research, deriving from a notable early achievement in the field and carrying forward both its experimental methodology and its theoretical outlook.

paradigm (parˑ··dīmˈ),

n a generally accepted model for making sense of phenomena in a given discipline at a particular time. When one paradigm is replaced by another, it is called a paradigm shift.

paradigm (par″ədīm),

n a model or pattern. The set of values or concepts that represent an accepted way of doing things within an organization or community.
paradigm shift,
n an adjustment in thinking that comes about as the result of new discoveries, inventions, or real-world experiences.

paradigm

a pattern of thought, a similarity of conceptualization.
References in periodicals archive ?
That Carlson was not a reprographics or photographic specialist helps prove one of Barker's main points: Paradigm shifters frequently come from the edge of a field; they are the boundary spanners who are not weighed down by the prevailing paradigm of any discipline.
The Swiss timepiece paradigm was founded on the assumption that mechanical technology (e.
But while every new paradigm in science has meant an advance in knowledge and understanding, it is not necessarily the same in politics.
Change is difficult, but Burkan told his listeners to promote and accept change, and identify and eradicate impediments that support old paradigms.
Burkan suggests seeking information outside one's field (benchmarking), understand personal and corporate paradigms and their obsolescence, and avoid the paralysis that stems from inaction.
Inverted Paradigms was formed to distribute newly developed software that guards computer systems from malware, spyware and viruses.
We customized OpsPlanner so that Hub One could immediately notify all distribution and retail outlets with critical stock recovery information such as product type, lot numbers, and disposition of the affected shipment," said Steve Fochler, CBCP, Director of Engagement Management for Paradigm Solutions International.
I'm glad to have Lori join the Paradigm team to assist us in managing our growth," Mr.
Huger, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Paradigm Holdings Inc.
As part of the FUSION64 bundles, Paradigm will be the single source for hardware and software integration, training and technical support.