Paracelsus


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Par·a·cel·sus

(par-ĕ-sel'sus),
Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, Swiss physician, 1493-1541. See: paracelsian method.

Paracelsus

(păr′ə-sĕl′səs) Originally Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim. 1493-1541.
German-Swiss alchemist and physician. He held that illness was the result of external agents attacking the body rather than imbalances within the body and advocated the use of chemicals against disease-causing agents.

Paracelsus

(păr-ă-sĕl′sŭs)
[Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, 1493–1541]
Swiss alchemist and physician who introduced several chemicals (lead, sulfur, iron, and arsenic) into pharmaceutical chemistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the past 24 years as Medical Director of Paracelsus, Dr.
As Paracelsus writes, 'there is nothing that nature has not signed in such a way that man may discover its essence'.
Unlike Paracelsus, I have an understanding and healthy appreciation of the cumulative detrimental effects of 10,000 sub-lethal events.
Paracelsus lived in a time of extraordinary intellectual turmoil, during the late stages of the Italian Renaissance and at the time of the Reformation.
Although Agrippa's methods of creation are different, and though he is much vaguer about his methods than is Paracelsus, it is clear that both men are referring to the production of an artificially made human--or, more precisely, an organic entity with a human form.
While Paracelsus cannot be claimed for any particular confession, Webster reveals his theological and social sympathies to align best with the spiritualistic and apocalyptical Anabaptists of South Germany.
The alchemist and scientist Paracelsus is believed to have been a student at Basel.
Viewing Paracelsus as a religious controversialist as well as a medical reformer, Webster notes in particular how his sense of living at a critical moment, at the end of time, energized his pugnacious campaign for the rejection of many traditional beliefs and practices.
During the early modern period, Paracelsus (1493/94-1541), the Swiss-German medical practitioner and natural philosopher, elaborated the macrocosm-microcosm analogy and the processes of separation.
Kahn brings a philological expertise and mastery of detail to the subject that distinguish his work from many earlier attempts, especially in the Anglo-Saxon world, to describe the influence of and reaction to that bugbear of the early modern medical establishment, Paracelsus.
North admitted Moore to Paracelsus Woman's Hospital (Paracelsus) later that same day because Moore complained that the pain radiated through her back.
It is fun to find these pictures-plus-stories of human beings linked to minerals--from Philipus Theophrastus Aureolus Bombastus von Hohenheim, called Paracelsus (1493-1541), namesake of the copper arsenate theoparacelsite, described in 2001, to Simon Engel (1973-), namesake of simonite, a Tl-Hg-As sulfide which the then-nine-year-old's father Peter Engel helped to describe in 1982.