Paracelsus

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Par·a·cel·sus

(par-ĕ-sel'sus),
Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, Swiss physician, 1493-1541. See: paracelsian method.
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Paracelsus

(păr′ə-sĕl′səs) Originally Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim. 1493-1541.
German-Swiss alchemist and physician. He held that illness was the result of external agents attacking the body rather than imbalances within the body and advocated the use of chemicals against disease-causing agents.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Paracelsus

(păr-ă-sĕl′sŭs)
[Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, 1493–1541]
Swiss alchemist and physician who introduced several chemicals (lead, sulfur, iron, and arsenic) into pharmaceutical chemistry.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
(123) Henri's urgency is striking and might be read as in part arising from belief in song as both erotic cure and potential charm--a belief consonant with Henri's well-known confidence in occult and Paracelsian remedies generally.
He then proceeds with a study of the 100 Paracelsian aphorisms that comprise the largest section of the Demosterion.
Furthermore, Weeks describes the Paracelsian imagination as being of two kinds: 1) the corporeal: the terrestrial/profane side; 2) the celestial: "faith" (these two sides constitute the total imagination as "astral body"):
For a fuller medical analysis of the fatal phallic power of woman's tongue as it is used by Lady Macbeth and the witches, see my recently published article, "The Pathogenic Female Tongue: A Galenic and Paracelsian Diagnosis of Macbeth," Humanitas Taiwanica 78 (2013): 209-37.
Van Helmont, a 17th century Belgian alchemist, worked from the Paracelsian model of sulfur, salt, and mercury in his pioneering research that "discovered" the properties of various gases, or geists (spirits).
Moshe Idel also notes that it is the "current view" among Jewish scholars that "the Jewish concept of the Golem contributed to the emergence of the Paracelsian view of the homunculus," although he disagrees with this view (185).
In the Friar's actions, "so tutored by [his] art" (5.3.243), we see reflections of Bruno whose "disenchantment with Aristotle made him receptive to Neoplatonic and Hermetic authorities even friendlier to a magical worldview." (30) In addition, he assumes a Paracelsian character, in that "Paracelsus transferred to the plane of natural philosophy or natural magic the mystic's direct, inward vision of God." (31) So steeped in the Friar's ill-chosen devotion to magical devices, Juliet's plans are doomed.
For the anonymous 'homish apothecarye', blindness "do lightely gret women whose floures fail before it be time" whilst "Sometime is the liver of a woman stopped/when her floures drawe upwarde/before it is due season." (47) Jorden named too little menstruation as one cause of suffocation of the mother, whereby "the matrix is drawne upwards or sidewards" and even in Hester's collection of Paracelsian remedies, a large number mention the danger of retained menses.
The topics include Paracelsian uroscopy and German chemiatric medicine in the Medicina Pensylvania of George de Benneville, the patients view of therapeutic pluralism and conflicting medical opinion, and the transmission of medical and pharmaceutical knowledge to colonial North America.
Paracelsianism--a slippery term that defies rigid definition--flourished, as is evident in Oswald Croll's important compilation of Paracelsian remedies, and the widespread patronage of Paracelsian physicians who served at the courts of Holy Roman Emperors and French and Spanish kings.
In the early seventeenth century, the Paracelsian alchemist and physician J.