Pappenheimer

Pap·pen·hei·mer

(pahp'ĕn-hī-mĕr),
A.M., U.S. pathologist, 1878-1955. His work in experimental pathology was extensive and included studies of the thymus, identification of the role of lice in the transmission in trench fever, development of an experimental model for rickets, and evaluation of viral infections in animals. See: Pappenheimer bodies.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The differential diagnosis included other red cell inclusions such as Pappenheimer bodies and Howell Jolly bodies.
Pappenheimer, "Chlorate candle as a source," Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, vol.
Particularly important is the detection of variations in cell shape and of red cell inclusions, such as Howell-Jolly bodies (nuclear fragments), Pappenheimer bodies (hemosiderin-containing granules) and basophilic stippling or punctate basophilia (altered ribosomes).
Unlike other basophilic inclusions such as Howell jolly bodies and Pappenheimer bodies which tend to be displaced to the periphery, basophilic stipplings are diffusely dispersed throughout the red cell cytoplasm.
Also Pappenheimer and Michel (2003) proved a decisive role of villi in the intestinal absorption of nutrients.
There's a German saying, "Ich kenne meine Pappenheimer", which roughly means "I know them inside out", and we search for its origins in the museum shop.
The Musik fur Jagdhdrner, for four E[flat] horns plus (ad lib.) B[flat] Furst Pless Horn and Bb parforcehorn, includes "Pappenheimer Jdgermarsch," by Peter Damm after a Kling duo for two horns and dedicated to the Parforcehorngruppe der Horngesellschaft Bayern, plus three works originally composed by Tyndare Gruyer (1850-1936), noted for his complete method for hunting horn (Methode complete de trompe de chasse).
A mechanism of absorption has been proposed whereby sugars exit the lumen via the intercellular spaces, a process termed solvent drag (Madara and Pappenheimer, 1987; Pappenheimer, 1990, 1987; Pappenheimer and Reiss, 1987).
Glenn Millikan and John Pappenheimer, working in the Department of Physiology at the University of Pennsylvania, had developed a working oximeter by 1940.
The instrument would not detect any red-cell inclusions, such as Howell-Jolly bodies, basophilic stippling, and Pappenheimer bodies.
Pappenheimer, James Ewing, and Arthur Purdy Stout, and in Freiberg, Germany, with Ludwig Aschoff.
"One of the reasons besides the merit of the book that attracts us to the book is the opportunity to promote," agrees Harper senior sales veep Andrea Pappenheimer. "If a celebrity is not willing to promote, it won't sell."