papillomavirus

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Related to Papilloma viruses: Warts, Human papillomaviruses

papillomavirus

 [pap″ĭ-lo´mah-vi″rus]
any member of a genus of viruses that cause papillomas in humans and various other animals.
human papillomavirus any of numerous species that cause warts, particularly plantar and venereal warts, on the skin and mucous membranes in humans, transmitted by either direct or indirect contact. They have also been associated with cervical cancer.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Pap·il·lo·ma·vi·rus

(pap'i-lō'mă-vī'rŭs),
A genus of viruses (family Papovaviridae) containing double-stranded circular DNA (MW 5 × 106), having virions about 55 nm in diameter, and including the papilloma and wart viruses of humans and other animals, some of which are associated with induction of carcinoma. More than 70 types are known to infect humans and are differentiated by DNA homology.
Synonym(s): papilloma virus
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

papillomavirus

(păp′ĭ-lō′mə-vī′rəs)
n.
Any of a group of DNA viruses of the family Papillomavirus that can cause warts and certain types of cancer in mammals.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

papillomavirus

Virology A group of viruses that cause noncancerous warty tumors on mucocutaneous surfaces–skin, larynx, uterine cervix. See Human papilloma virus.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Pap·il·lo·ma·vi·rus

(pap'i-lō'mă-vī'rŭs)
A genus of viruses containing DNA and including the papilloma viruses and wart viruses of humans and other animals, some of which are associated with induction of carcinoma. More than 70 types are known to infect humans and are differentiated by DNA homology.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

papillomavirus

Any virus of the Papillomavirus genus of the Papovaviridae family. These viruses cause various kinds of warts, including venereal warts. Papillomavirus infections are thought to be the probable reason for the higher incidence of cancer of the cervix in women with many sexual partners.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Patient discussion about papillomavirus

Q. Should I Vaccinate My Daughter Against HPV? I have a 12 year old daughter. Her School wants all the girls aged 12 and up to be vaccinated against HPV. A lot of Parents are against this vaccine. I want to know more about this vaccine and if I should vaccinate my daughter.

A. before you would like to go on with any vaccination, you should check out this very long list of links:

http://www.aegis.ch/neu/links.html

at the bottom you will also find links in english. vaccinations in general are very disputable/dubious and it is probably time that we learn about it.

More discussions about papillomavirus
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References in periodicals archive ?
The human papilloma viruses (HPV) constitute a large group of more than 100 viruses.
The autogenous vaccines stimulate the immune system against the papilloma viruses. The variation of response may be attributed to type of virus involved, developmental stages of papillomas, method of collection of papilloma tissues and preparation of vaccine, schedule of administration and immune function of the patient.
Mr zur Hausen was cited for finding human papilloma viruses that cause cervical cancer, the second most common cancer among women.
Papilloma viruses are known to cause cervical cancer many years after the original infection.
The main reason to examine men, however, is that they may serve as a potential reservoir of oncogenic papilloma viruses. Although 56 distinct types have been identified, (5) not all cause cancer.
Subsequent studies by Greenspan's group showed the virallesion probably contains an unusual mixture of Epstein-Barr and papilloma viruses, both of which have been named as possible cancer agents.
Genomicand phylogenetic analysis of two novel bovine papilloma viruses, BPV-9 and BPV-10.