pantothenic acid

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Related to Pantothenic: pyridoxine, folic acid

pantothenic acid

 [pan″to-then´ik]
a vitamin of the B complex present in all living tissues, almost entirely in the form of a coenzyme A (CoA). (See also vitamin.) This coenzyme has many metabolic roles in the cell, and a lack of pantothenic acid can lead to depressed metabolism of both carbohydrates and fats. The daily requirement for this vitamin has not been established, and no definite deficiency syndrome has been recognized in humans, perhaps because of its wide occurrence in almost all foods. Intakes of 4 to 7 mg/day are safe and adequate for adults. Some symptoms attributed to deficiency of other B complex vitamins may be due to a lack of pantothenic acid.

pan·to·then·ic ac·id

(pan'tō-then'ik as'id),
The β-alanine amide of pantoic acid. A growth substance widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, and essential for growth of a number of organisms; dietary deficiency causes dermatitis in chicks, and dermatitis and achromotrichia in rats; a precursor to coenzyme A.

pantothenic acid

/pan·to·the·nic ac·id/ (-ik) a component of coenzyme A and a member of the vitamin B complex; necessary for nutrition in some animal species, but of uncertain importance for humans.

pantothenic acid

(păn′tə-thĕn′ĭk)
n.
A yellow oily acid, C9H17NO5, belonging to and found widely in plant and animal tissues.

pantothenic acid

a vitamin of the B complex present in all living tissues, almost entirely in the form of a coenzyme A (CoA). This coenzyme has many metabolic roles in the cell, and a lack of pantothenic acid can lead to depressed metabolism of both carbohydrates and fats. The daily requirement for this vitamin has not been established and no definite deficiency syndrome has been recognized in humans, perhaps due to its wide occurrence in almost all foods.

pantothenic acid

[pan′təthen′ik]
a member of the vitamin B complex. It is widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, almost entirely in the form of coenzyme A (CoA). This coenzyme has many metabolic roles in the cell, and a lack of pantothenic acid can lead to depressed metabolism of both carbohydrates and fats. No definite deficiency syndrome has been recognized in humans, perhaps due to its wide occurrence in almost all foods.

pantothenic acid

An essential nutrient involved in nutrient metabolism. Pantothetic acid (vitamin B5) is present in dairy products, egg yolks, leafy greens, legumes, liver and whole grains; it has been used by some alternative healthcare providers to treat allergies, anxiety, colitis, depression, eczema, fatigue, hay fever, hypoglycaemia, urticaria and to stimulate weakened adrenal glands. The recommended daily requirement is 100 mg.

pan·to·then·ic ac·id

(pan'tŏ-then'ik as'id)
The β-alanine amide of pantoic acid. A growth substance widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, and essential for growth of a number of organisms; deficiency in diet causes a dermatitis in chicks and rats and achromotrichia in the latter; a precursor to coenzyme A.

pantothenic acid

One of the B group of vitamins and a constituent of coenzyme A which has a central role in energy metabolism. Deficiency is rare.

pantothenic acid

or

vitamin B5

a water soluble organic acid (C9H17O5N) that is present in all animal tissues, especially the liver and kidney. Pantothenic acid forms part of coenzyme A which, when bonded to acetic acid, forms ACETYLCOENZYME A. The vitamin is present in almost all foods, especially fresh vegetables and meat, eggs and yeast. A deficiency causes nervous disorders with poor motor coordination.

pan·to·then·ic ac·id

(pan'tŏ-then'ik as'id)
The β-alanine amide of pantoic acid. A growth substance widely distributed in plant and animal tissues, and essential for growth of a number of organisms; deficiency in diet causes a dermatitis in chicks and rats and achromotrichia in the latter; a precursor to coenzyme A.

pantothenic acid

a vitamin of the B complex group present in all living tissues as part of the coenzyme A (CoA) molecule or the acyl carrier protein.

pantothenic acid nutritional deficiency
a nutritional essential in all species other than ruminants which synthesize it in the rumen. Recorded as a natural occurrence only in poultry and pigs on heavy corn diets. Manifested in pigs by diarrhea, dermatitis, incoordination with a spastic gait and ulcerative colitis. Fowls show poor hatchability of eggs, poor feather development and dermatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The influence of the variables pantothenic acid, sodium chloride, yeast extract, and cell condition was studied in the responses: biomass, ethanol, sorbitol, and levan using a [2.
Pantothenic acid (PA) has crucial roles in intermediary metabolism as a constituent of coenzyme A (CoA) and phosphopantotheine.
Pantothenic acid: Helps stimulate the release of energy from carbohydrates, fats and proteins.
Pantothenic acid plays a role in the release of energy from which macronutrient?
6], copper, magnesium, niacin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, potassium, thiamin, some good-quality protein, and dietary fiber.
Unlike refined flour, which is usually enriched with just thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, and iron, whole-grain flour contains the minerals zinc, copper, magnesium, and chromium, as well as 50 to 80 percent more of such nutrients as vitamin B6, vitamin E, pantothenic acid, and folic acid.
His new data also show that previous nutrient values for iron, fat, vitamin B-12 and pantothenic acid (a B vitamin) overestimate levels in today's eggs by at least 10 percent.
Quantitation of Pantothenic Acid in Fortified Foods by Stable Isotope Dilution Analysis and Method Comparison with a Microbiological Assay (Michael Rychlik).
4 GOOSEBERRIES contain small amounts of essential vitamins such as pyridoxine (vitamin B6), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), folates and thiamin (vitamin B1).
The new Flavor Infuser(TM) and Energy Drops have 50mg of caffeine and ten percent of the daily values of four B vitamins: folate (B5), B6, B12, and pantothenic acid (B9) per serving.
4 OTHER important vitamins include vitamin E (antioxidant), vitamin K (helps blood clotting) and six of the B complex vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, vitamin B6, niacin, folate and pantothenic acid).
Through this activity, the B vitamins thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, and biotin help in orchestrating the release of energy from carbohydrates, fats, and amino acids.