Panicum

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Panicum

a genus of grasses in the family Poaceae. May contain sufficient nitrate or oxalate to cause poisoning with these substances. They are highly productive and popular annual and perennial grasses and cereal crops but many of them cause hepatogenous photosensitization due probably to a high content of steroidal saponins in the plants. Edematous enlargement and icteric staining of the cranial tissues gives rise to the common names of yellow bighead and yellow thickhead.

Panicum anticum
brachiaria mutica.
Panicum antidotale
may contain sufficient oxalate to cause oxalate poisoning in sheep or osteodystrophia in horses. Also reported as a cause of atypical interstitial pneumonia. Called also blue panic grass.
Panicum capillare
causes nitrate-nitrite poisoning; called also witchgrass.
Panicum coloratum
may contain high oxalate (see above) or cause hepatogenous photosensitization. Called also Coolah grass, kleingrass.
Panicum crus-galli
reputed to cause photosensitization.
Panicum decompositum
suspected high levels of steroidal saponins causing hepatogenous photosensitization. Called also native millet (Australia).
Panicum dichotomiflorum
causes hepatogenous photosensitization due to steroidal saponins; called also smooth witchgrass.
Panicum effusum
causes hepatogenous photosensitization due probably to steroidal saponins. Called also hairy millet.
Panicum maximum
poisoning characterized by hepatogenous photosensitization due probably to steroidal saponins Called also pigeon grass, guinea grass.
Panicum maximum var. trichoglume
causes equine osteodystrophia fibrosa, Called also green panic.
Panicum miliaceum
an annual cereal crop. Causes hepatogenous photosensitization due probably to steroidal saponins. Called also French millet.
Panicum muticum
brachiariamutica.
Panicum purpurascens
a coarse, high-producing pasture grass. Called also para grass.
Panicum queenslandicum
causes hepatogenous photosensitization due probably to steroidal saponins. Called also Yabila grass.
Panicum schinzii (syn. Panicum laevifolium var. contractum)
causes hepatogenous photosensitization due to steroidal saponins. Called also sweet grass.
Panicum virgatum
causes hepatogenous photosensitization due probably to steroidal saponins.
Panicum whitei
causes hepatogenous photosensitization due probably to steroidal saponins. Called also P. laevinode, pepper grass.