Panaeolus


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Panaeolus

Toxicology A mushroom with significant quantities of psilocybin, a hallucinogen Clinical 20–60 mushrooms may be ingested to obtain the desired hallucinogenic effect; small amounts of Panaeolus spp evoke euphoria, dizziness, weakness; larger amounts alter temporal and spatial perception and induce hallucinations Management Supportive. See Poisonous mushroom.
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Signs of anorexia observed in the study on LTE are similar as the adverse effects of lyophilized extracts of the wild mushrooms Panaeolus subalteatus, Macrolepiota procera and Hygrophoropsis auratiacus claimed by others [2].
This substance is chemically similar to the natural occurring psilocin (4-hydroxy-N, N-dimethyltryptamine, 4-HO-DMT) (Figure 1), found among psychoactive fungi in the genus Psilocybe, Panaeolus and others (Passi, Seifert, Schneider, & Emrich, 2002) together with psilocybin (Figure 1).
However, other ring-containing compounds such as psilocin (found in Psilocybe, Panaeolus and Conocybe mushrooms) and some 5-hydroxytryptamines also produce a positive result rendering the Meixner test nonspecific.
He describes this as "doubtless the Japanese psilocybin species" which he identifies as the same species as the "food of the gods" or teonanacatl of Mexico or hallucinogenic Panaeolus campanulatus.