Palmer

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Palmer

 [pahl´mer]
Sophia E. (1853–1920). American nursing writer and organizer; first editor of the American Journal of Nursing. She campaigned for state registration of nursing and assisted in drafting much of the legislation. She served as first president of the New York State Board of Examiners and helped to organize the American Nurses' Association and the American Society of Superintendents of Training Schools for Nurses.

Pal·mer

(pahl'mĕr),
Walter L., U.S. physician, *1896. See: Palmer acid test for peptic ulcer.
References in classic literature ?
His arms fell down to his sides, and his head drooped on his breast, his knees bent under his weight, every nerve and muscle of his frame seemed to collapse and lose its energy, and he sunk at the foot of the Palmer, not in the fashion of one who intentionally stoops, kneels, or prostrates himself to excite compassion, but like a man borne down on all sides by the pressure of some invisible force, which crushes him to the earth without the power of resistance.
Stand up, Isaac, and hearken to me,'' said the Palmer, who viewed the extremity of his distress with a compassion in which contempt was largely mingled; ``you have cause for your terror, considering how your brethren have been used, in order to extort from them their hoards, both by princes and nobles; but stand up, I say, and I will point out to you the means of escape.
Gurth, whose occupation, though now held so mean, gave him as much consequence in Saxon England as that of Eumaeus in Ithaca, was offended at the familiar and commanding tone assumed by the Palmer.
and travelling in company with the Palmer to boot ''
I would I were a black Prior or a barefoot Palmer, to avail myself of thy unwonted zeal and courtesy certes, I would make more out of it than a kiss of the hand.
Meanwhile the travellers continued to press on their journey with a dispatch which argued the extremity of the Jew's fears, since persons at his age are seldom fond of rapid motion, The Palmer, to whom every path and outlet in the wood appeared to be familiar, led the way through the most devious paths, and more than once excited anew the suspicion of the Israelite, that he intended to betray him into some ambuscade of his enemies.
When the travellers had pushed on at a rapid rate through many devious paths, the Palmer at length broke silence.
Our road,'' said the Palmer, ``should here separate; for it beseems not men of my character and thine to travel together longer than needs must be.
Money and recompense,'' said the Palmer, interrupting him, ``I have already said I require not of thee.
The Palmer started, and turned suddenly towards the Jew: ``What fiend prompted that guess?
But consider,'' said the Palmer, ``my character, my dress, my vow.
So saying, he was turning his mule's head away, when the Palmer, in his turn, took hold of his gaberdine.