palindrome

(redirected from Palindromist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Palindromist: palindrome

pal·in·drome

(pal'in-drōm),
In molecular biology, a self-complementary nucleic acid sequence; a sequence identical to its complementary strand, if both are "read" in the same 5' to 3' direction, or inverted repeating sequences running in opposite directions (for example, 5'-AGTTGA-3') on either side of an axis of symmetry; palindromes occur at sites of important reactions (for example, binding sites, sites cleaved by restriction enzymes); imperfect palindromes exist, as do interrupted palindromes that allow the formation of loops.
[G. palindromos, a running backward]

palindrome

(păl′ĭn-drōm′)
n.
A segment of double-stranded DNA in which the nucleotide sequence of one strand reads in reverse order to that of the complementary strand.

pal′in·dro′mic (-drō′mĭk, -drŏm′ĭk) adj.

palindrome

[pal′indrōm′]
Etymology: Gk, palin + dromos, course
a segment of DNA in which identical or almost identical sequences of bases run in opposite directions of the complementary strands. Palindromes are often sites for attack by restriction endonucleases.
Etymology A word, phrase, number or other sequence of units that can be read the same way in either direction—adjustment of punctuation and spaces between words is permitted
Molecular biology Inverted repeat A sequence of duplex DNA or RNA with dyad symmetry that reads the same in the 5’ to 3’ direction on complementary strands; DNA-binding proteins may recognise palindromes.

pal·in·drome

(pal'in-drōm)
molecular biology A self-complementary nucleic acid sequence; a sequence identical to its complementary strand, if both are "read" in the same 5'-3' direction, or inverted repeating sequences running in opposite directions (but same 5'- to 3'- direction) on either side of an axis of symmetry; palindromes occur at sites of important reactions.
[G. palindromos, a running backward]
Palindromeclick for a larger image
Fig. 243 Palindrome .

palindrome

a sequence in double-stranded nucleic acids that reads the same on both strands when reading one strand from left to right and the other from right to left (i.e. both strands are read 5′ 3′). See Fig. 243 .In a single-stranded molecule, COMPLEMENTARY BASE PAIRING can occur when the chain is folded back (See also HAIRPIN). Palindromes occur in, for example, many operator sequences (see OPERON MODEL), transcription terminator sequences (see TRANSCRIPTION).and most recognition sites for RESTRICTION ENZYMES.

palindrome

literally, something that reads the same backwards as forwards. In nucleic acid biochemistry palindromic sequences of 4 to 10 or more base pairs occur not infrequently. These are of interest because they are recognition sites for cleavage by restriction endonuclease enzymes; responsible for secondary structures in nucleic acids such as the folding of RNA molecules or the hairpin structures found at the termini of the single-stranded DNA genome of parvoviruses.

interrupted palindrome
restriction enzymes such as BglI recognize sequences which are interrupted palindromes, e.g. GCNNN↓NGGC where N is any nucleotide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, palindromists who strive for coherence, clarity and naturalness of language in their compositions are confronted by the prosaic fact that most "natural" language, and especially spoken language, consists largely of palindromically unexciting short words.
If his results too often seem only a caricature of poetry, blame it on the considerable logological constraints under which he toiled and not on his muse, for not even the most adept of palindromists can be expected simply to neutralize, somehow, those expression-impeding limitations.
But we are ready to start profiling our top palindromists now, and we need your help.
Well known palindromists dominated the SymmyS nominations and awards, starting with the World Palindrome Championship finalists: Jon Agee, John Connett, MIT Professor Nick Montfort, Barry Duncan (about whom The Believer wrote a much-publicized feature article), Doug Fink, and Martin Clear of Australia.
The awareness of this community of palindromists led to the creation of the first ever World Palindrome Championship (WPC) in Brooklyn, New York on March 16, 2012.
A film-maker named Michael Rossi was making a film about Barry Duncan and was keen to include input from other palindromists and to film the WPC itself.
Many individual palindromists have contributed to this trend, but a few landmarks of the phenomenon may be mentioned.
Various palindromists have composed many such variations over the years, most recently Jeff Grant in the Nov 2011 issue of Word Ways.
Webster's Third offers two adjectivations of his name, Sotadean and Sotadic; the latter seems more popular with modern palindromists, possibly because it is easier to palindromize, as in the following mini-story which is related by its three main characters--Eli, Eb and religious salvation fanatic Ida, who often seems to be on another page: