palindrome

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pal·in·drome

(pal'in-drōm),
In molecular biology, a self-complementary nucleic acid sequence; a sequence identical to its complementary strand, if both are "read" in the same 5' to 3' direction, or inverted repeating sequences running in opposite directions (for example, 5'-AGTTGA-3') on either side of an axis of symmetry; palindromes occur at sites of important reactions (for example, binding sites, sites cleaved by restriction enzymes); imperfect palindromes exist, as do interrupted palindromes that allow the formation of loops.
[G. palindromos, a running backward]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

palindrome

(păl′ĭn-drōm′)
n.
A segment of double-stranded DNA in which the nucleotide sequence of one strand reads in reverse order to that of the complementary strand.

pal′in·dro′mic (-drō′mĭk, -drŏm′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Etymology A word, phrase, number or other sequence of units that can be read the same way in either direction—adjustment of punctuation and spaces between words is permitted
Molecular biology Inverted repeat A sequence of duplex DNA or RNA with dyad symmetry that reads the same in the 5’ to 3’ direction on complementary strands; DNA-binding proteins may recognise palindromes.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pal·in·drome

(pal'in-drōm)
molecular biology A self-complementary nucleic acid sequence; a sequence identical to its complementary strand, if both are "read" in the same 5'-3' direction, or inverted repeating sequences running in opposite directions (but same 5'- to 3'- direction) on either side of an axis of symmetry; palindromes occur at sites of important reactions.
[G. palindromos, a running backward]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Palindromeclick for a larger image
Fig. 243 Palindrome .

palindrome

a sequence in double-stranded nucleic acids that reads the same on both strands when reading one strand from left to right and the other from right to left (i.e. both strands are read 5′ 3′). See Fig. 243 .In a single-stranded molecule, COMPLEMENTARY BASE PAIRING can occur when the chain is folded back (See also HAIRPIN). Palindromes occur in, for example, many operator sequences (see OPERON MODEL), transcription terminator sequences (see TRANSCRIPTION).and most recognition sites for RESTRICTION ENZYMES.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
Unique locks which involve a T6 sequence do not exist because 123123 can be further split into the locked palindromic sequences 121 and 323.
So far, each pair of locked sequences has been of the same genre, both palindromic sequences or both tautonymic sequences, some of the same length, some of different lengths.
A second palindromic sequence (12321 ) is converted into a Miami sequence (12312 or 21321 ).
One palindromic sequence and one tautonymic sequence are converted into new sequences of the same length and genres.
One palindromic sequence and one Miami sequence are converted into new sequences of the same length and genres.
2 palindromic sequences are converted into a tautonymic sequence and a new palindromic sequence.
Two palindromic sequences are converted into a Miami sequence and a new palindromic sequence.
In EVERYWHERE and ENERGUMENE the top and bottom, as well as the L and R edges, are palindromic and, in the latter, the top and bottom palindromic sequences are identical.