Palaeolithic

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Palaeolithic

the period of the emergence of primitive man, from c .600,000 to 14,000 years ago. Stone tools were used, and existence was solely by hunting and gathering, with no cultivation.
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Archaeological samples found in Azykh Paleolithic camp were shown at the Paris Museum's exhibition "The first inhabitants of Europe" in 1981.
The Middle Paleolithic was a part of the Stone Age, and it spanned from 300,000 to 30,000 years ago.
Now it will probably become a significant image in the Upper Paleolithic cave bestiary of the Southern Urals," said  Vladislav Zhitenev, head of Moscow State University's (MSU) South Ural archeological expedition and leading researcher for the Kapova and Ignatievskaya caves, said in a (http://www.
While the researchers can only speculate as to the symbolic significance of the engravings, they suggest that they represent an early and unique example of cannibalistic funerary behavior that has not been previously recognized in the Paleolithic period.
Benefits of a Paleolithic diet with and without supervised exercise on fat mass, insulin sensitivity and glycaemic control: a randomised controlled trial in individuals with type 2 diabetes.
This is the first report of the discovery of a Paleolithic site in the northern massifs of the central Alborz, he added.
His book begins with pathology and medicine in the Paleolithic period, illustrated with a trephined skull of the same period.
The earliest archaeological artifacts in Iran, like those excavated at the Kashafrud and Ganj Par sites, attest to a human presence in Iran since the Lower Paleolithic era, 800,000-200,000 BC.
Lord Palmer, above, is a hereditary peer, a concept so outdated that carbon-testing is required to work out in which paleolithic era it was last deemed a good idea.
Contract notice: Archaeological Excavation Work Tranche 1 - Zac Les Portes Du Tarn - Paleolithic Period
Synopsis: "The Earliest Instrument: Ritual Power and Fertility Magic of the Flute in Upper Paleolithic Culture" by Lana Neal investigates the earliest known musical instruments within the larger cultural context.
soldiers who arrive on a convoy in Afghanistan only to find themselves transported through time to Earth's Paleolithic world of Asia, where they discover groups of people throughout time who have also been displaced.