palaeobotany

(redirected from Paleobotanists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Paleobotanists: Palaeobotanist

palaeobotany

the study of fossils plants, particularly fossils of pollen grain, which are used in reconstructing past environments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cyperaceae is a particularly good example of the lack of connection between neobotanists and paleobotanists, although this has been changing in recent years.
Selena Smith, a paleobotanist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, uses X-ray imaging to explore the evolutionary history of banana and ginger plants from the order Zingiberales through their fossilized seeds.
While paleobotanists once focused on collecting fossil flora and trying to make connections with present-day varieties, Dilcher and his colleagues have produced new insights into the evolutionary biology of flowering plants through close analysis of morphology and anatomy.
Whereas many paleobotanists were content to study only the commonly preserved compression fossils, Dawson had an additional interest in anatomically preserved plants.
But it's the ancient image of the tree's needles and branches that make an impression on paleobotanists.
And perhaps only expert knowledge, embodied by and embedded in the work of climatologists, geologists, oceanographers, dendrologists and paleobotanists, can give us that view.
Professor Edwards has spent her entire academic career at Cardiff University, starting in 1969, and her research has made her one of the world's leading paleobotanists.
Paleontologists and paleobotanists have long thought that bees and flowering plants evolved together.
The fossil-bearing strata also yielded fossils of numerous species of flora and fauna (Kretzoi, 1975), and Rudabanya became an important study site not only for paleoanthropologists, but also for paleozoologi sts and paleobotanists.
The origin of corn is still a subject of intense study and academic debate among paleobotanists.
Discovered by paleobotanists (scientists who study fossilized plants) last spring in Morocco, Archaeopteris grew to heights of more than 27 meters (90 feet) and had a 1-meter-wide trunk.