palaeobotany

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palaeobotany

the study of fossils plants, particularly fossils of pollen grain, which are used in reconstructing past environments.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Cyperaceae is a particularly good example of the lack of connection between neobotanists and paleobotanists, although this has been changing in recent years.
Selena Smith, a paleobotanist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, uses X-ray imaging to explore the evolutionary history of banana and ginger plants from the order Zingiberales through their fossilized seeds.
'Previously, paleobotanists thought that a tree called Archaeopteris was the oldest tree.
"Our work reaches across many disciplines involving paleontologists, biomechanical engineers, paleobotanists, and others to showcase how we go about reconstructing the mysterious life of dinosaurs."
What was the key characteristic that distinguished Dawson from his fellow paleobotanists? Without doubt it was his recognition of the importance of studying fossil plants in their geological context and, in particular, the development of a sustained field-based research program.
But it's the ancient image of the tree's needles and branches that make an impression on paleobotanists. Fossils of the dawn redwood are among the most common plant fossils in the state and are found west and east of the Cascades.
And perhaps only expert knowledge, embodied by and embedded in the work of climatologists, geologists, oceanographers, dendrologists and paleobotanists, can give us that view.
Professor Edwards has spent her entire academic career at Cardiff University, starting in 1969, and her research has made her one of the world's leading paleobotanists. In 1996, her recognition as one of the most distinguished scientists in the Commonwealth came about with her election to the Fellowship of the Royal Society.
Paleontologists and paleobotanists have long thought that bees and flowering plants evolved together.
The fossil-bearing strata also yielded fossils of numerous species of flora and fauna (Kretzoi, 1975), and Rudabanya became an important study site not only for paleoanthropologists, but also for paleozoologi sts and paleobotanists. The site is now covered by a protective roof, and further excavation and investigation is continuing.
The origin of corn is still a subject of intense study and academic debate among paleobotanists. Corn's generous tendency to produce eight or more rows of kernels (totaling 500 to 1,000 nutrition-filled seeds) per cob is not observed in any living wild grass.