palatal

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Related to Palatal consonant: alveolar consonant, Velar consonant, Palatalisation

pal·a·tal

(pal'ă-tăl),
Relating to the palate or the palate bone.
Synonym(s): palatine

palatal

(păl′ə-təl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the palate.
2. Linguistics
a. Produced with the front of the tongue near or against the hard palate, as the (y) in English young.
b. Produced with the blade of the tongue near the hard palate, as the (ch) in English chin.
c. Produced with the front of the tongue in a forward position. Used of a vowel.
n. Linguistics
A palatal sound.

pal′a·tal·ly adv.

pal·a·tal

(pal'ă-tăl)
Relating to the palate or the palate bone.
Synonym(s): palatine.

palatal

1. Pertaining to the palate.
2. Of phonation, produced with the front of the tongue near or against the hard palate.

pal·a·tal

(pal'ă-tăl)
Relating to palate or palate bone.
Synonym(s): palatine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The traditional view (re-argued by, e.g., Hogg 1992: [section]47-73; Voss 1995), that <ie> after graphs representing palatal consonants signified a diphthong of the same type as that produced by i-umlaut of West-Saxon diphthongs, leaves us with the same problem of the redundancy of the digraph by the time of the earliest texts.
Arguably, <ie> could be seen to have a place in West-Saxon orthography, despite its redundancy with respect to umlauted diphthongs: it could have been (a) a sequence of diacritic plus vowel graph following graphs respresenting palatal consonants, and (b) a sequence representing disyllabic vowels, the second of which was lost in certain forms by, or after, the ninth century.
As compared to labials and dentals, the greater resistance of palatal consonants in the upper registers is due to the fact that the buccal opening in singing increases as the note becomes higher--a wide buccal opening is more compatible with a relatively open palatal articulation than with a very close labial or dental articulation.