gutta-percha

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Related to Palaquium: Palaquium gutta

gutta-percha

 [gut″ah-per´chah]
the coagulated, dried, purified latex of trees of the genera Palaguium and Payena, most commonly Palaguium gutta; used in orthopedics for fracture splints, in surgery for temporary sealing of cavities, and in dentistry in the form of cones for filling root canals or sticks for sealing cavities over treatment.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

gut·ta-per·cha

(gut'ă-pĕr'chă),
The coagulated, purified, dried, milky juice of trees of the genera Palaquium (especially P. gutta and Payena (family Sapotaceae); a polyterpene-containing a trans isomer of rubber used as a filling material in dentistry, and in the manufacture of splints and electrical insulators; a solution is used as a substitute for collodion, as a protective, and to seal incised wounds. Compare: chicle, gutta.
[Malay gatah, gum, + percha, the name of a tree]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gut·ta-per·cha

(gut'ă-pĕr'chă)
The coagulated, purified, dried, milky juice of trees of the genera Palaguium and Payena (family Sapotaceae); used as a filling material in dentistry, especially to fill root canals in endodontics, and in the manufacture of splints and electrical insulators; a solution is used as a substitute for collodion, as a protective, and to seal incised wounds. Solid at room temperature and soft and pliable when heated.
[Malay gatah, gum, + percha, the name of a tree]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

gut·ta-per·cha

(gut'ă-pĕr'chă)
The coagulated, dried, milky juice of trees of the genera Palaquium; polyterpene-containing a trans isomer of rubber used as a filling material in dentistry, and in the manufacture of splints and electrical insulators; a solution is used as a substitute for collodion, as a protective, and to seal incised wounds.
[Malay gatah, gum, + percha, the name of a tree]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, it was unlikely that French officials would endorse or invest in plantations of such trees as they too would not want to risk growing a product that might not be successful--it could be grown as an adjunct to the more important varieties (Palaquium or Isonandra), but probably no more than that.
That is, disagreeing with him that the Dichopsis, Palaquium and honandra were all the same plant, however, Combanaire was correct in this assertion.
Bitis usually comes from Palaquium ridleyi, Palaquium stellatum and Madhuca utilis.
A running mean of relative frequency was plotted for each of three species - Syzygium inophylloides (Myrtaceae), relatively common; Palaquium stehlinii, relatively rare; and Planchonella samoensis (Sapotaceae), intermediate density.
tonganus were included in a more intensive survey of comparative use (Artocarpus altilus [Moraceae], Cananga odorata, Carica papaya [Caricaceae], Inocarpus fagifer, Palaquium stehlinii, Planchonella garberi [Sapotaceae], Planchonella grayana, Planchonella samoensis, Syzygium inophylloides, and Terminalia catappa [Combretaceae]).
It was obtained from various species of the Palaquium (and sometimes the Payena) genus of the Sapotaceae family, especially Palaquium gutta, P.