pair bond

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pair bond

n.
The temporary or permanent association formed between two animals during courtship and mating.

pair′-bond′ v.

pair bond

a relationship established between the male and female of higher vertebrates for breeding purposes. In some cases, such as swans, it may last for life.
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However in species like puffins, which have to migrate to distant wintering grounds during the non-breeding season, very little is known about how mates maintain their pair-bond and behave.
Yet the clueless fellows can change, forming pair-bonds for life with the opposite sex and even distinguishing between two female strangers.
Ornithologists traditionally have viewed this elaborate behavior as cementing the pair-bond. Albano, however, believes that courtship feeding is critical to kingfisher nesting success because it augments the female's energy supply at a particularly taxing time, when the egg mass constitutes more than half of her body weight.
This newly developed ZyXEL End-to-End IPv6 Compliant Bonding Solution includes VDSL2 DSLAM with two models (VES1724 and VES-1608FE-57), a line-card (VLC1424G-56) for extendibility and pair-bonded VDSL gateways (P-873HNUP) featuring dual-functions with a Gigabit Ethernet WAN interface for FTTH applications and 802.11n Wi-Fi connection for up to 300Mbps.
Pair-bonded "monogamous" animals are almost always hyposexual, having sex as the Vatican recommends: infrequently, quietly, and for reproduction only.
Thus, given the opportunity, pair-bonded females also exhibited multi-male mating.
Asif Ghazanfar of Princeton University, said that they were surprised by how reliably the marmoset monkeys exchanged their vocalizations in a cooperative manner, particularly since in most cases they were doing so with individuals that they were not pair-bonded with.
They're trying to understand whether humans are a naturally pair-bonded species and if this is the case, whether we pair bond for life or for just as long as it takes to raise a child.
Results from the study will help to understand whether humans are a naturally pair-bonded species and if this is the case, whether we pair bond for life or, as some have suggested, just for as long as it takes to raise a child past "toddlerhood".
The findings underscore how monogamy and pair-bonds - relatively rare social formations among mammals - can benefit certain individuals, with potential implications for understanding how human relationship patterns may have evolved.
In dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), individuals that were sired by a male other than their mother's pair-bonded partner grew up to have higher reproductive success than did individuals whose mother stayed faithful to her partner.