glasses

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glasses

 [glas´ez]
lenses arranged in a frame holding them in the proper position in front of the eyes, as an aid to vision. Called also eyeglasses and spectacles.
bifocal glasses glasses with bifocal lenses; see also bifocal glasses.
trifocal glasses glasses with trifocal lenses.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

glass·es

(glas'ĕz),
1. Synonym(s): spectacles
2. Lenses for correcting refractive errors in the eyes.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

glasses

(glăs′ĭz)
n.
A pair of lenses mounted in a frame and used to correct refractive errors of the eyes or to protect the eyes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

spec·ta·cles

(spek'tă-kĕlz)
Lenses set in a frame that holds them in front of the eyes, used to correct errors of refraction or to protect the eyes. The parts of the spectacles are: the lenses; the bridge between the lenses, resting on the nose; the rims or frames, encircling the lenses; the sides or temples that pass on either side of the head to the ears; the bows, the curved extremities of the temples; and the shoulders, short bars attached to the rims or the lenses and jointed with the sides.
Synonym(s): eyeglasses, glasses.
[L. specto, pp. -atus, to watch, observe]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

spectacles 

An optical appliance consisting of a pair of ophthalmic lenses mounted in a frame or rimless mount, resting on the nose and held in place by sides extending towards or over the ears. Syn. eyeglass frame; eyeglasses; eyewear (colloquial); glasses; spectacle frame. See acetone; pantoscopic angle; retroscopic angle; angling; bridge; clipover; eczema; endpiece; eyesize; front; hinge; lens washer; lorgnette; mount; pad; plastic; rim; side; spectacle frame markings; sunglasses; temple; tortoiseshell.
aphakic spectacles Spectacles mounted with aphakic lenses used to compensate the loss of optical power resulting from a cataract extraction when no intraocular lens implant has been inserted. Syn. cataract glasses. See aphakic lens.
billiards spectacles Spectacles incorporating joints that enable the wearer to adjust the angle of the sides (British Standard).
folding spectacles Spectacles that are hinged at the bridge and in the sides, so as to fold with the two lenses in apposition.
half-eye spectacles A pair of spectacles for near vision, designed so that the lenses cover only half of the field of view, usually the lower half (Fig. S10). Syn. half-eyes.
hemianopic spectacles Spectacles incorporating a device that provides a lateral displacement of one or both fields of view. The device is usually a prism such as a Fresnel Press-On prism, which is placed over the blind (hemianopic) side of the visual field. A mirror system may also be used. The view within that side of the field is imaged on the seeing side of the visual field of the eye.
industrial spectacles Spectacles made with plastic or safety glass and solid frame, sometimes with side shields. They are used in industrial occupations where there are possible hazards to the eye. See Fig. S6; safety glass; goggles; safety lens.
library spectacles A plastic spectacle frame with heavyweight front and sides. Syn. library frame.
magnifying spectacles Spectacles containing lenses of high convex power (+10 D or higher) used for near vision.
orthopaedic spectacles Spectacles with attachments designed to relieve certain anatomical deformities such as entropion, ptosis, etc. See Horner's syndrome.
pinhole spectacles Spectacles fitted with opaque discs having one or more small apertures. They are used as an aid in certain types of low vision (e.g. corneal scar). See stenopaeic spectacles; low vision.
recumbent spectacles Spectacles intended to be used while recumbent. They usually incorporate a prism that deflects a beam of light through approximately 90º while keeping the image erect. See yoke prisms.
reversible spectacles Spectacles that are designed to be worn with either lens before either eye.
rimless spectacles Spectacles without rims, the lenses being fastened to the frame by screws, clamps or similar devices. See lens groove; rim.
stenopaeic spectacles Spectacles fitted with opaque discs having a slit. They are used as an aid in certain types of low vision. See stenopaeic disc; pinhole spectacles; low vision.
supra spectacles Spectacles in which the lenses are held in position by thin nylon threads attached to the rims. See lens groove; rim.
telescopic spectacles See telescopic lens.
Fig. S10 Half-eye spectaclesenlarge picture
Fig. S10 Half-eye spectacles
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

Patient discussion about glasses

Q. My myopic son is wearing power glasses. Are there any other nutritional supplements to support eye sight? My myopic son is wearing power glasses from the age of 2 years. His power is not very high yet but the rate of his eye power is doubling every year. Doctor had given him some medicines and had told him to have lots of carrots. We are giving him carrot juice every day. But soon he stopped taking it for some months. But he is having juice now but I wish to know are there any other nutritional supplements to support eye sight?

A. eating carrots can help people who suffers from vitamin A or beta-carotene deficiency. which leads to poor night vision. but that's it. there is no reason to eat tremendous amounts of carrots, there are food supplements that will help you achieve it without becoming orange. anyway, getting too much vitamin A can be toxic.
here is a "snopes" about it-
http://www.snopes.com/food/ingredient/carrots.asp

More discussions about glasses
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References in periodicals archive ?
Periyanayakam returned to work that day with a $2 pair of glasses. He was among 400 people who showed up at a daylong clinic in a high school run by ophthalmologists, lens grinders and vision screeners.
However, with the help of Lions around the world and the Recycle for Sight program, Lions Clubs International is bringing clear vision to millions, one pair of glasses at a time.
We can imagine a pair of glasses with quintessential Apple design (iGlass), which enable a Hololens-type experience," UBS analyst Steven Milunovich said, (http://www.ibtimes.com/google-quietly-updates-google-glass-amid-apple-smart-glasses-rumors-2555373) commenting on the existence of the Apple Glasses earlier this year.
According to Clive Miller, CEO of Optometry Giving Sight, there are over 600 million people around the world who are blind or vision impaired simply because they don't have access to an eye exam and a pair of glasses.
4 -- Google's ambitious and futuristic, augmented reality project - Google Glass which has a pair of glasses with a (HUD) Heads Up Display is seeing some new developments.
An eye examination and a pair of glasses can be provided for as little as PS17 per person.
When compared with all plano sunglass buyers in the United States, consumers who buy sunglasses in the supermarket channel are more likely to be older than 45, come from lower-income households and just buy a single pair of glasses per transaction.
In one advert for glasses, a child deliberately jumps up and down on a couch, wrecking a pair of glasses.
BAD POINTS: Watching this in 3D could cost you the best part of pounds 10 - or more if you are shelling out for your first pair of glasses. The edible joke about one boy losing his manhood was clearly rejected by Sacha Baron Cohen for not being in the best possible taste.
Shafik owns Eye Opticians in Islington Row, Edgbaston, and was approached by Hustle's costume designer for the previous series to create a pair of glasses for veteran Hollywood actor Robert Vaughn, who stars in the show.
Shafik Haji, owner of Eye Opticians on Islington Row, Edgbaston, was approached by Hustle's costume designer for the previous series to create a pair of glasses especially for actor Robert Vaughn and the producers were so impressed that they asked him to supply all the glasses and sunglasses for the latest series of the BBC drama.
Though optometrists can assess the prescription of a pair of glasses from another seller, they would not be able to determine the impact resistance of finished lenses.