pain scale

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pain scale

An assessment tool used to measure the intensity of a patient's discomfort.
See: Numerical Rating Scale; visual analog scale
See also: scale

pain scale

an objective value of subjective pain; value (between 0 and 10) is ascribed by the patient to the pain experience, where 0 = no pain at all, and 10 = worst pain experienced/imaginable; used to note pain in relation to daily activities, or document pain changes over a period of time (e.g. a week or month) in relation to a specific therapeutic interventions
References in periodicals archive ?
FLACC scores reported indicated a highly correlational relationship with the 0 to 10 and COMFORT pain scales values (p = 0.
Valid behavioral pain scales are necessary to ensure appropriate assessment of pain and to guide decisions for pain management in this vulnerable population.
Typical pain scales, such as visual analog or Likert type scales, are often impossible for these patients to use when reporting pain.
10,11 However, bias created by the subjectivity of the pain scales used during those studies cannot be overcome.
190 Table 2: Paired T Test to Compare the Three Pain Scales Paired Differences t Sig.
As the HZ patients and PHN patients are suffering from relatively severe pain, the pain scales of 0 and I degree do not exist, so the 0 and I are not shown in the [Figure 1].
All three pain scales are considered reliable though VAS has better reliability and when repeated within a short period of time, 90% of the scores are close together.
Researchers selected 20 patients ages 17-81 (10 males/10 females) with confirmed joint damage and cartilage injuries, diagnosed with imaging/scoping with low to high pain scales.
Following 12 weeks of twice weekly yoga or massage therapy sessions (20 min each) both therapy groups versus the control group had a greater decrease on depression, anxiety and back and leg pain scales and a greater increase on a relationship scale.
Degree of postoperative pain was evaluated 6 times/d for 4 days by use of 3 methods: an electronic perch for assessment of weight-bearing load differential of the pelvic limbs, 4 numeric rating pain scales for assessment of pain (all of which involved the observer in the same room as the bird), and analysis of video-recorded (observer absent) partial ethograms for bird activity and posture.