analgesic

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analgesic

 [an″al-je´zik]
1. relieving pain.
2. pertaining to analgesia.
3. an agent that relieves pain without causing loss of consciousness.
narcotic analgesic opioid analgesic.
nonsteroidal antiinflammatory analgesic (NSAIA) nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug.
opiate analgesic (opioid analgesic) any of a class of compounds that bind with a number of closely related specific receptors (opioid receptors) in the central nervous system to block the perception of pain or affect the emotional response to pain; such compounds include opium and its derivatives, as well as a number of synthetic compounds, and are used for moderate to severe pain. Chronic administration or abuse may lead to dependence.

an·al·ge·sic

(an'ăl-jē'zik),
1. A compound capable of producing analgesia, that is, one that relieves pain by altering the perception of nociceptive stimuli without producing anesthesia or loss of consciousness. Synonym(s): analgetic (1)
2. Characterized by reduced response to painful stimuli. Synonym(s): antalgic

analgesic

/an·al·ge·sic/ (-je´zik)
1. relieving pain.
2. pertaining to analgesia.
3. an agent that relieves pain without causing loss of consciousness.

narcotic analgesic  opioid a.
nonsteroidal antiinflammatory analgesic  (NSAIA) see under drug.
opioid analgesic  any of a class of compounds that bind with the opioid receptors in the central nervous system to block the perception of pain or affect the emotional response to pain, including opium and its derivatives.

analgesic

(ăn′əl-jē′zĭk, -sĭk)
n.
A medication that reduces or eliminates pain.
adj.
Of or causing analgesia.

analgesic

[an′əljē′zik]
1 relieving pain.
2 a drug that relieves pain. The opioid analgesics act on the central nervous system and alter the patient's perception; they are more often used for severe pain. The nonopioid analgesics act primarily at the periphery, do not produce tolerance or dependence, and do not alter the patient's perception; they are used for mild to moderate pain. Compare anodyne. See also pain intervention.

an·al·ge·sic

(an'ăl-jē'zik)
1. A compound capable of producing analgesia, i.e., one that relieves pain by altering perception of nociceptive stimuli without producing anesthesia or loss of consciousness.
2. Characterized by reduced response to painful stimuli.

analgesic

1. Pain-relieving.
2. A pain-relieving drug.

analgesic

a substance that reduces pain without causing unconsciousness.

Analgesic

A medication that relieves pain without causing loss of consciousness. Over-the-counter analgesics include aspirin and NSAIDs.

analgesic

a drug used to relieve pain. See also acetylsalicylic acid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), opiates; Drugs and the law.

analgesic

agents inducing analgesia
  • centrally acting analgesics see opioid analgesics

  • non-opioid analgesics analgesic agents with peripheral action (e.g. paracetamol, aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)

analgesic,

adj 1. pain relieving.
n 2. medication used to manage mild to moderate pain, usually by acting on the central nervous system.

analgesic 

A remedy or agent that relieves pain.

an·al·ge·sic

(an'ăl-jē'zik)
1. A compound capable of producing analgesia, i.e., one that relieves pain by altering the perception of nociceptive stimuli without producing anesthesia or loss of consciousness.
2. Characterized by reduced response to painful stimuli.

analgesic (anəljē´zik),

adj (analgetic), 1. the property of a drug that enables it to raise the pain threshold (e.g., nitrous oxide).
n 2. an analgesic may be classified in one of two groups: an analgesic that blocks the sensory neural pathways of pain (e.g., xylocaine) or an analgesic that acts directly on the thalamus to raise the pain threshold.

analgesic

1. relieving pain.
2. pertaining to analgesia.

analgesic antagonist
used for the control of excessive reaction to or overdosing with the narcotic analgesics. See also nalorphine, naloxone.
analgesic nephropathy
papillary necrosis due to local ischemia resulting from the antiprostaglandin effect of aspirin, phenylbutazone and phenacetin.
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