analgesic ladder

(redirected from Pain Ladder)
A venerated approach to managing a range of pain severity, formulated by the WHO for cancer; the ladder divides pain into
(1) mild—requiring NSAIDs and, if the pain is post-operative in nature, infiltration with local anaesthetics
(2) moderate—Step 1 plus opioid analgesics PRN
(3) severe—Step 1 and Step 2 plus local anesthetic neural blockade ±catheter plus sustained-release opioid analgesics
The stepwise approach to pain is valid for other types of pain—e.g., postoperative pain, sickle crisis pain, pelvic inflammatory disease

analgesic ladder

, World Health Organization analgesic ladder
A framework for the treatment of pain in patients with cancer and other disorders, in which the patient is treated first with anti-inflammatory analgesics such as ibuprofen or mild, non-narcotic pain relievers such as acetaminophen but subsequently may be treated with narcotic analgesics of increasing strengths if anti-inflammatory drugs or adjunctive therapies do not alleviate pain.
References in periodicals archive ?
2 World Health Organization's Pain Ladder for cancer 3.
23-25) Recommendations for pharmacologic therapy generally parallel the World Health Organization pain ladder (as adapted for noncancer pain in Figure 4), and those regarding surgery are inconsistent.
The World Health Organization's (WHO) pain ladder is an excellent tool for planning a pain management regimen.
The World Health Organization developed a three-step pain ladder to help guide the choice of drugs based upon the severity of pain (Figure 1).
The one great success we've had in pain has been in cancer pain, where the WHO [World Health Organization] pain ladder has really made an enormous difference over the past 25 years," Dr.
These Schedule II products, plus the unscheduled injectable pain treatment Duraclon(R), complement the Company's strategy to focus its efforts more specifically in the pain management category and offer a broad array of prescription products for the treatment of pain as identified in the World Health Organization's Pain Ladder.